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Not all Ammonia-Free Color is Created Equal

Before we jump to any conclusions, one should know the differences among the salon industry’s top professional color lines – not all ammonia-free hair color is created equal.

First, let’s quickly remind ourselves the part ammonia plays in hair color:

Ammonia’s primary function is to raise the pH of the hair, open the cuticle, and allow for color to enter the cortex. The more ammonia in a color product, the higher the pH of the hair will become and the wider the cuticle will open.

The average working pH of hair processed with ammoniated hair color is 10-11, while the natural isometric pH of hair is 4.5-5.5!

NOTE: The pH scale is logarithmic, meaning with each rise in pH level, the new level is 10x more alkaline or acidic than the previous level – that’s huge!

This means ammonia-based hair color makes the hair 600x more alkaline than it’s original state. This blasting open of the cuticle makes re-closing the hair nearly impossible, resulting in a major loss of protein and moisture, as well as imminent color fading and damage.

Depending on the brand, you can find any number of these ingredients used instead of ammonia.
– Monoethanolamine (MEA)
– Ethanolamine
– Cocomide MEA
– Aminomethylpropanol (AMEA)

Here’s where the difference in ammonia free hair color lines gets serious!

While MEA or Ethanolamine are odorless and not as corrosive as ammonia, the pH of the hair is STILL raised to an extraordinarily high level, if used in the same percentages as ammonia.

The only thing most brands have achieved in removing ammonia is just that – the removal of ammonia – they’ve still neglected one of the most vital components of hair health – a balanced pH!

So, what can professional ammonia free hair color brands do to ensure the pH of the hair is kept intact?

The answer is simple – use heat to help open the cuticle.

If a professional, ammonia-free color line doesn’t use heat to help open the cuticle, they’re using MEA or Ethanolamine in the same percentages as ammonia, and consequently, wreaking havoc on the structural integrity of the hair.

Aim for color lines that minimize the use of Ethanolamine and MEA, not ones that just simply swap ammonia for an odor-free alternative.

Most ammonia-free hair color lines use a synthetic source of Ethanolamine – produced by the reaction of ethylene oxide with ammonia.

However, there’s a natural source of Ethanolamine derived from the fatty acids in coconut, called Cocomide MEA. The natural emollients present in this form of MEA makes this option much more desirable in hair color.

The extraction method is more costly than cooking up some synthetic MEA in a lab.

Alas, there’s another problem with using Ethanolamine and MEA in higher than necessary percentages… the removal process.

It has been postulated that this ingredient is hard to remove from hair.

Companies still standing by ammoniated hair color have used this aspect of MEA as a way to denounce its effectiveness, but have failed to realize one enormous detail.

The best ammonia-free hair color lines have added Oleic acid (derived from olive oil) to safely remove any product left on the hair.

However, some ammonia-free color lines haven’t caught on to this little trick – make sure to use brands that have!

We’ve covered the primary role of ammonia, and it’s more desirable alternatives, but don’t forget – ammonia also has a secondary function.

When mixed with peroxide, ammonia neutralizes the existing color pigment, allowing color to further penetrate the cuticle.

Ethanolamine and MEA aren’t capable of doing this effectively.

So, an ammonia-free hair color line must have a color delivery system that compensates for the lack of ammonia.

Top-rated hair color lines have found an oil-based delivery system not only solves this problem, but that it actually works better than ammonia.

Hair absorbs oil before water, so using oil as a means of color molecule transport is not only effective, but optimal in any color line.

When deciding which ammonia-free color line is best for your salon and stylists, be sure to dig deeper into these type of ingredients!

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    According to the F.D.A., Brazilian Blowouts are extremely hazardous to your health!

    The Brazilian Blowout is very effective for smoothing hair, but it’s nowhere near worth the harmful health effects it has on stylists and clients, but don’t worry, at My Hair Trip Salon we have an organic healthy alternative that will give you the same silky smooth hair as a Brazilian blowout, without causing the severe harm associated with the traditional Brazilian blowout.

    FDA, OSHA Act on Brazilian Blowout

    FDA has received a number of inquiries from consumers and salon professionals concerning the safety of “Brazilian Blowout” and similar “professional use only” hair smoothing products. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Hazard Alert in April 2011 to hair salon owners and workers about potential formaldehyde exposure from working with these products. On August 22, 2011, FDA issued a Warning Letter citing Brazilian Blowout for safety and labeling violations. The following information is intended to answer questions people may have on this subject.
    FDA’s Role in Regulating These Products

    FDA regulates cosmetics, including hair smoothing products, under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and, if they are marketed on a retail basis to consumers, under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Under these laws, cosmetics do not have to be approved by FDA before going on the market. However, cosmetics must be safe and properly labeled, and companies and individuals who manufacture or market them have a legal responsibility for the safety and labeling of their products and ingredients. FDA can take action against cosmetics on the market that do not comply with the law. To learn more, see FDA Authority Over Cosmetics.

    What This Warning Letter Says About Brazilian Blowout

    FDA issues Warning Letters to notify firms or individuals that they have been found in violation of the laws FDA enforces. A Warning Letter also tells what violations need to be corrected in order to comply with the law.

    The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter cites both safety and labeling violations. For example, the letter lists health risks associated with inhaling formaldehyde and reactions that have been reported when people used the product as directed. Among the reported reactions were eye problems, nervous system problems such as headaches and dizziness, respiratory tract problems, nausea, chest pain, vomiting, and rash. The letter also states that the labeling was misleading because it called the product “formaldehyde free,” even though people were exposed to formaldehyde when using it as intended. The labeling also failed to reveal possible consequences of using this product under the conditions prescribed in the labels or labeling.

    Regulation of Salon Safety

    FDA does not have authority over the operation of salons or the practice of cosmetology.

    Workplace safety in general, including air quality issues, is regulated by OSHA. Salons are also generally subject to state and local authorities, which may specify safety practices such as assuring proper ventilation.

    What OSHA Says About These Products

    During investigations, OSHA found formaldehyde in the air when stylists used hair smoothing products, some of which did not have formaldehyde listed on their labels or in Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) as required by law. During one investigation, air tests showed formaldehyde at levels greater than OSHA’s limits, even though the product tested was labeled as formaldehyde-free. OSHA states that formaldehyde presents a health hazard if workers are exposed. It can irritate the eyes and nose; cause allergic reactions of the skin, eyes, and lungs; and is linked to nose and lung cancer.

    For OSHA’s complete statement, see Hazard Alert: Hair-Smoothing Products That Could Release Formaldehyde.

    Similar Products That Use Formaldehyde-related Ingredients

    The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter should not be interpreted as a broad evaluation of the safety of hair-smoothing products or such ingredients as formaldehyde, methylene glycol, or other formaldehyde-related ingredients. Other hair-smoothing products may vary with respect to composition, intended conditions of use, and other factors. FDA continues to evaluate these products for safety and labeling on a case-by-case basis.

    FDA’s Advice to Consumers

    Skin sensitivity can develop after repeated contact with formaldehyde-related ingredients. When formaldehyde is released into the air it can cause serious irritation of your eyes, nose and lungs. It is recommended that you limit your exposure to products that contain formaldehyde-related ingredients to reduce these health risks.

    Read the label. If you’re purchasing a product on a retail basis, whether at a store or by mail order, including on the Internet, the product is required to have a list of the ingredients. If it doesn’t, please let FDA know. The list of ingredients is required under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Here are some ingredients to look for:

    Formaldehyde
    Formalin
    Methylene glycol
    Ask your salon professional. Products that are marketed only to salon professionals may not have a list of ingredients, because the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act doesn’t apply to them. They are required, however, to have directions for safe use, and OSHA requires them to have an MSDS. You can ask salon professionals if they know whether a product contains formaldehyde-related ingredients or other ingredients you may wish to avoid. In its Hazard Alert on formaldehyde dangers to hair salon owners and workers, OSHA addressed the information companies should provide to salon workers in an MSDS. However, as OSHA also pointed out, the MSDS for Brazilian Blowout did not contain all the required information.
    Report bad reactions. Consumers are one of FDA’s most important sources of information, especially because the law doesn’t require cosmetics to be approved by FDA before they go on the market. To report a reaction to a cosmetic product, use one of these contacts:

    1) Reporting by phone to the Consumer Complaint Coordinator at your nearest FDA district office. Phone numbers are posted on FDA’s Web page, Consumer Complaint Coordinators, and in the Blue Pages of the phone book, generally under United States Government/Health and Human Services.

    2) Reporting online to FDA’s MedWatch adverse event reporting system. You also may call Medwatch at 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form by mail.

    Salon workers also can file complaints about unsafe workplaces with OSHA, as stated in OSHA’s Hazard Alert.

    Where to Learn More

    For information on workplace exposure to formaldehyde, see Formaldehyde on OSHA’s website. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has published resources on formaldehyde on its website under Formaldehyde: NIOSH Resources.

    FDA will continue to monitor safety issues regarding hair-smoothing products and will report on any new developments.

    October 8, 2010; updated October 18, 2010, May 24, 2011, and October 21, 2011

    Article found at FDA, OSHA Act on Brazilian Blowout

    FDA has received a number of inquiries from consumers and salon professionals concerning the safety of “Brazilian Blowout” and similar “professional use only” hair smoothing products. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Hazard Alert in April 2011 to hair salon owners and workers about potential formaldehyde exposure from working with these products. On August 22, 2011, FDA issued a Warning Letter citing Brazilian Blowout for safety and labeling violations. The following information is intended to answer questions people may have on this subject.
    FDA’s Role in Regulating These Products

    FDA regulates cosmetics, including hair smoothing products, under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and, if they are marketed on a retail basis to consumers, under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Under these laws, cosmetics do not have to be approved by FDA before going on the market. However, cosmetics must be safe and properly labeled, and companies and individuals who manufacture or market them have a legal responsibility for the safety and labeling of their products and ingredients. FDA can take action against cosmetics on the market that do not comply with the law. To learn more, see FDA Authority Over Cosmetics.

    What This Warning Letter Says About Brazilian Blowout

    FDA issues Warning Letters to notify firms or individuals that they have been found in violation of the laws FDA enforces. A Warning Letter also tells what violations need to be corrected in order to comply with the law.

    The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter cites both safety and labeling violations. For example, the letter lists health risks associated with inhaling formaldehyde and reactions that have been reported when people used the product as directed. Among the reported reactions were eye problems, nervous system problems such as headaches and dizziness, respiratory tract problems, nausea, chest pain, vomiting, and rash. The letter also states that the labeling was misleading because it called the product “formaldehyde free,” even though people were exposed to formaldehyde when using it as intended. The labeling also failed to reveal possible consequences of using this product under the conditions prescribed in the labels or labeling.

    Regulation of Salon Safety

    FDA does not have authority over the operation of salons or the practice of cosmetology.

    Workplace safety in general, including air quality issues, is regulated by OSHA. Salons are also generally subject to state and local authorities, which may specify safety practices such as assuring proper ventilation.

    What OSHA Says About These Products

    During investigations, OSHA found formaldehyde in the air when stylists used hair smoothing products, some of which did not have formaldehyde listed on their labels or in Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) as required by law. During one investigation, air tests showed formaldehyde at levels greater than OSHA’s limits, even though the product tested was labeled as formaldehyde-free. OSHA states that formaldehyde presents a health hazard if workers are exposed. It can irritate the eyes and nose; cause allergic reactions of the skin, eyes, and lungs; and is linked to nose and lung cancer.

    For OSHA’s complete statement, see Hazard Alert: Hair-Smoothing Products That Could Release Formaldehyde.

    Similar Products That Use Formaldehyde-related Ingredients

    The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter should not be interpreted as a broad evaluation of the safety of hair-smoothing products or such ingredients as formaldehyde, methylene glycol, or other formaldehyde-related ingredients. Other hair-smoothing products may vary with respect to composition, intended conditions of use, and other factors. FDA continues to evaluate these products for safety and labeling on a case-by-case basis.

    FDA’s Advice to Consumers

    Skin sensitivity can develop after repeated contact with formaldehyde-related ingredients. When formaldehyde is released into the air it can cause serious irritation of your eyes, nose and lungs. It is recommended that you limit your exposure to products that contain formaldehyde-related ingredients to reduce these health risks.

    Read the label. If you’re purchasing a product on a retail basis, whether at a store or by mail order, including on the Internet, the product is required to have a list of the ingredients. If it doesn’t, please let FDA know. The list of ingredients is required under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Here are some ingredients to look for:

    Formaldehyde
    Formalin
    Methylene glycol
    Ask your salon professional. Products that are marketed only to salon professionals may not have a list of ingredients, because the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act doesn’t apply to them. They are required, however, to have directions for safe use, and OSHA requires them to have an MSDS. You can ask salon professionals if they know whether a product contains formaldehyde-related ingredients or other ingredients you may wish to avoid. In its Hazard Alert on formaldehyde dangers to hair salon owners and workers, OSHA addressed the information companies should provide to salon workers in an MSDS. However, as OSHA also pointed out, the MSDS for Brazilian Blowout did not contain all the required information.
    Report bad reactions. Consumers are one of FDA’s most important sources of information, especially because the law doesn’t require cosmetics to be approved by FDA before they go on the market. To report a reaction to a cosmetic product, use one of these contacts:

    1) Reporting by phone to the Consumer Complaint Coordinator at your nearest FDA district office. Phone numbers are posted on FDA’s Web page, Consumer Complaint Coordinators, and in the Blue Pages of the phone book, generally under United States Government/Health and Human Services.

    2) Reporting online to FDA’s MedWatch adverse event reporting system. You also may call Medwatch at 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form by mail.

    Salon workers also can file complaints about unsafe workplaces with OSHA, as stated in OSHA’s Hazard Alert.

    Where to Learn More

    For information on workplace exposure to formaldehyde, see Formaldehyde on OSHA’s website. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has published resources on formaldehyde on its website under Formaldehyde: NIOSH Resources.

    FDA will continue to monitor safety issues regarding hair-smoothing products and will report on any new developments.

    article found at http://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/productsingredients/products/ucm228898.htm

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      Organic Color Systems at My Hair Trip Salon Denver

      At My Hair Trip Salon, we use Organic Color Systems for our color line. It is truly amazing and our styists and clients love it.
      Organic Color Systems is the latest advanced organic formulation technology and it has:
      No Ammonia, or Ammonia Derivatives
      No Formaldehyde or Formaldehyde Derivatives
      No Diamine Toluenes or any other PTD’s
      No Plastics (Plastics Free Styling)
      No Sodium Laurel Sulphates (SLS)
      No Thioglycolates or Parabens
      Full spectrum of bio-balanced vitamins & plant extracts
      Packed with certified organic ingredients
      Rich in anti-oxidants, and nutrients

      Organic Salon Systems is the world’s only hair color that is:
      • Truly Salon Exclusive & ammonia free;
      • Supreme 100% Resistent Grey Coverage;
      • Exclusive Certified Organic Ingredients;
      • Certified Vegan & Cruelty-Free by PETA;
      • Guaranteed Supreme Performance;
      • Rich with Nutrients, Antioxidants, Vitamins, & Amino Acids.

      • 54 colors
      • 10 concentrates and brighteners
      • 8 cream and liquid activators
      • 2 non-bleach lightening systems

      All these products are completely intermixable to produce an unlimited array of shades, tones, and specialized results. The gel consistency of the color and array of thickness of the activators finally empowers you to truly become a hair color artist.

      Ammonia is a damaging corrosive toxin that should be kept out of the salons because:

      It severely damages the cuticle and destroys tyrosine, the hair’s protein that develops melatonin (hair’s natural pigmentation). The more the tyrosine protein is damaged, the less capable the hair is of “holding on to” color.

      It is a caustic toxin that causes both short and long term damage to the throats and lungs. Long term exposure can permanently damage the respiratory system.

      Organic Color Systems provides Colorists with a comprehensive professional system that delivers unsurpassed results with only the most natural and organic ingredients.

      A lot of salons tell their stylists and clients that their color lines are natural or organic, or ammonia free, but they are not. Ask your stylist or your salon what line they use and do your own research. It does matter, it’s your health and your life.

      Why should you have to sacrifice your health and wellbeing to get the look that you want. Now there is a Denver salon that specializes in achieving any and every look without causing any harm to your health.

      My Hair Trip Salon Denver specializes in chemical free, eco-friendly hair care products and services. At Denver’s only certified green salon, barbershop, art gallery, and boutique they understand that what you put on your hair and skin needs to be just as safe as the things that we eat.

      This sustainable hair salon in the heart of the Denver Art District is leading the way for salons everywhere, for the sake of our clients and our staff.

      http://www.organiccolorsystems.com/

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        Health: The real benefits of going organic, plus beauty the natural way

        Organic vegetables, fruit and cereals – and the food made from them – are between 19 and 69 per cent higher in key antioxidants, which are linked to health benefits. They also contain significantly lower levels of toxic heavy metals and pesticides, according to new research. International experts, led by Professor Carlo Leifert at Newcastle University, carried out the analysis of 343 studies on the nutritional differences between organic and conventionally grown crops. The increased antioxidants could be equivalent to eating one to two more portions of veg or fruit daily, say the experts.

        Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-2744886/Health-Notes.html#ixzz3DM3guc1X
        Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

        Beauty the natural way
        May I draw your attention to Organic Beauty Week, which starts tomorrow? Many of the organic cosmetic brands that Jo Fairley and I highlight in The Ultimate Natural Beauty Bible (Kyle Books, £19.99*) are offering special shopping events and offers (online and in store), demos, workshops and talks.
        So, why consider organic cosmetics? For some, it makes sense to put environment- and animal-friendly, ethical and sustainably sourced products on your body as well as in it. But for many, the compelling factor is skin irritation. In the experience of Dr Rabia Malik (drrabiamalik.com), who specialises in natural solutions to skin problems, ‘Synthetic chemicals in skincare, combined with the pollution our skin faces daily, can trigger or exacerbate sensitivity.’
        When doctors told high-flying PR Sarah Brown that the only treatment for her chronic urticaria (a serious skin allergy) was a daily high dose of antihistamines, she started investigating her beauty products to identify any ingredients that might be triggering the attacks. What she found shocked her: ‘Synthetic ingredients very commonly used in cosmetics can cause skin sensitisation and allergies, either immediately or through prolonged use.’
        Sarah’s solution was to launch Pai (paiskincare.com), an organically certified, plant-based skincare range, in 2007.
        ‘It was important to have organic certification because I discovered that some so-called natural skincare companies were using the same synthetic chemicals, while making misleading “organic” claims,’ she says.

        Skincare can be therapeutic in its own right. Suffolk-based herbalist and aromatherapist Margaret Weeds, co-founder of Essential Care (now rebranded as Odylique, odylique.co.uk), began creating products by hand in the 1980s to soothe her own and her family’s highly sensitive, eczema-prone skin. Her concoctions, made from pure plant oils with herbs from her garden, were so effective that friends and clients queued up for remedies. A request for shampoo to treat scalp psoriasis led to Gentle Herb Shampoo, the world’s first organically certified shampoo. A decade later, these multi-award-winning products are still formulated by Margaret and handmade in Suffolk.
        For more information about events nationwide in Organic Beauty Week, visit soilassociation.org/organicbeautyweek

        Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-2744886/Health-Notes.html#ixzz3DM3kjLn2
        Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

        FIVE OF THE BEST Ayurvedic herbal remedies for autumn
        Sebastian Pole, co-founder of Pukka Herbs (pukkaherbs.com), shares his favourites
        Brahmi may improve memory and concentration and strengthen the nervous system. Perfect for
        Elderberry
        anyone studying, under stress or suffering autumn blues. Take long term to support neurotransmitter communications and reinvigorate the brain. For age 18-plus. Try Pukka Illuminate, £14.95 for 30 capsules.
        Elderberry deactivates the cold virus and strengthens cells so that our bodies can better resist a virus multiplying; also effective for removing congestion from the respiratory tract. Take daily through the winter. For age two-plus. Try Pukka Elderberry Syrup, £12.46 for 100ml.
        Andrographis is a potent antiviral and antibacterial with immune-stimulating effects which may reduce the length and intensity of a respiratory infection or flu. Use at the first symptoms of cold/flu until they disappear. For age 18-plus. Try Pukka Organic Andrographis whole leaf, £14.95 for 60 capsules.
        Gnger
        Ginger improves circulation thus warming hands and feet and also has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant compounds, as well as quelling nausea. Try Pukka Three Ginger tea, £2.29 for 20 sachets.
        Liquorice helps remove congestion and mucus from the body (so good for catarrh), is deeply nourishing for people who are tired and/or stressed, good for the digestive system (for acidity and ulcers in particular), among many other properties. Try Pukka’s Peppermint & Licorice tea, £2.29 for 20 sachets.
        Most of the above products are also available from victoriahealth.com

        Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-2744886/Health-Notes.html#ixzz3DM3xleQa
        Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

        Article found at: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/you/article-2744886/Health-Notes.html

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          Kombucha

          Have you heard of Kombucha, the beverage the ancient Chinese called the “Immortal Health Elixir?” It’s been around for more than 2,000 years and has a rich anecdotal history of health benefits like preventing and fighting cancer, arthritis, and other degenerative diseases.

          Made from sweetened tea that’s been fermented by a symbiotic colony of bacteria and yeast (a SCOBY, a.k.a. “mother” because of its ability to reproduce, or “mushroom” because of its appearance), Kombucha didn’t gain prominence in the West until recently.

          In the first half of the 20th century, extensive scientific research was done on Kombucha’s health benefits in Russia and Germany, mostly because of a push to find a cure for rising cancer rates. Russian scientists discovered that entire regions of their vast country were seemingly immune to cancer and hypothesized that the kombucha, called “tea kvass” there, was the cause. So, they began a series of experiments which not only verified the hypothesis, but began to pinpoint exactly what it is within kombucha which was so beneficial.

          German scientists picked up on this research and continued it in their own direction. Then, with the onset of the Cold War, research and development started being diverted into other fields. It was only in the 1990s, when Kombucha first came to the U.S., that the West has done any studies on the effects of Kombucha, and those are quite few in number. As is typically the case in the U.S., no major medical studies are being done on Kombucha because no one in the drug industry stands to profit from researching a beverage that the average consumer can make for as little as 50 cents a gallon.

          Thanks to it’s rising commercial popularity in the last decade, the older Russian and German research has been made available in English to Westerners, and a few wide-spread anecdotal surveys have been sponsored by Kombucha manufacturers, but that’s about it. While there are limited amounts of research done on the beverage, there has been lots of research done on many of the nutrients and acids it contains in large quantities (such as B-vitamins, antioxidants, and glucaric acids).

          Regardless of the “lack” of scientific evidence, the fact remains that this beverage has 2,000 plus years of tradition behind it and an ardent and addicted following.

          What are the health benefits of Kombucha Tea?
          Kombucha Health Benefit #1 — Detoxification

          Detoxification produces healthy livers and aides cancer prevention. One of kombucha’s greatest health benefits is its ability to detox the body. It is rich in many of the enzymes and bacterial acids your body produces and/or uses to detox your system, thus reducing your pancreatic load and easing the burden on your liver. Kombucha is very high in Glucaric acid, and recent studies have shown that glucaric acid helps prevent cancer. I know 2 people in my immediate circle of friends who have had cancer (pancreatic and breast) and fought it into remission without any chemo or radiation therapy. Instead, they warded it off by detoxing their lives (going 100% organic, removing chemical cleaners and agents in their home, changing their diet to be at least 80% raw or fermented, etc.) Central to the detoxification process was drinking Kombucha regularly. Even Alexander Solzhenitsyn, the recently deceased Russian author and nobel-prize winner, in his autobiography, claimed that kombucha tea cured his stomach cancer during his internment in soviet labor camps. (And because of this testimony, President Reagan used Kombucha to halt the spread of his cancer in 1987. You’ll note he didn’t die until 2004, and that was from old age, NOT cancer.)

          Kombucha Health Benefit #2 — Joint Care

          Kombucha contains glucosamines, a strong preventive and treatment all forms of arthritis. Glucosamines increase synovial hyaluronic acid production. Hyaluronic acid functions physiologically to aid preservation of cartilage structure and prevent arthritic pain, with relief comparable to NSAIDs and advantage over glucocorticoids. Hyaluronic acid enables connective tissue to bind moisture thousands of times its weight and maintains tissue structure, moisture, lubrication and flexibility and lessens free radical damage, while associated collagen retards and reduces wrinkles.

          Kombucha Health Benefit #3 — Aids Digestion and Gut Health

          Because it’s naturally fermented with a living colony of bacteria and yeast, Kombucha is a probiotic beverage. This has a myriad of benefits such as improved digestion, fighting candida (harmful yeast) overgrowth, mental clarity, and mood stability. As such, it’s noted for reducing or eliminating the symptoms of fibromyalgia, depression, anxiety, etc.

          Kombucha Health Benefit #4 — Immune Boosting

          Kombucha is extraordinarily anti-oxidant rich, and you all know the benefits of anti-oxidants for boosting your immune system and energy levels.

          Where can you learn more about kombucha health benefits?
          Here are a few articles on the health benefits of kombucha:

          http://www.kombu.de/val-gwf.htm
          http://www.gaiaresearch.co.za/kombucha.html
          http://www.acupuncture.com/herbs/kombucha1.htm
          http://www.gokombucha.com/health_benefits.html

          Are the health benefits of kombucha for real?
          When I first read about the panacea of benefits, I was skeptical. How could one beverage do so many things? But then I realized that it’s not so much that the beverage does something to our bodies, like a medicine targeted at curing specific symptoms. It’s more that this beverage promotes health. It gives your body what it needs to heal itself by 1)aiding your liver in removing harmful substances, 2)promoting balance in your digestive system, and 3)being rich in health-promoting vitamins, enzymes, and acids.

          The general consensus seems to be that with regular, daily consumption, you’ll notice improvement in immune system functioning and energy levels within about a week, the healing of more minor ailments within a month or so, and the healing of more radical illnesses within a year or so.

          Article found at: http://www.foodrenegade.com/kombucha-health-benefits/

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