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The planetary health diet.

“New Lancet report demonstrates why diet and food production must radically change to improve health and avoid potentially catastrophic damage to the planet

With more than 3 billion people malnourished and food production driving climate change, biodiversity loss and pollution, a transformation of the global food system is urgently needed.

Findings from the EAT-Lancet Commission on Healthy Diets From Sustainable Food Systems provides the first scientific targets for a healthy diet from a sustainable food production system that operates within planetary boundaries for food. The report promotes diets consisting of a variety of plant-based foods, with low amounts of animal-based foods, refined grains, highly processed foods, and added sugars, and with unsaturated rather than saturated fats.

The work behind the report is the result of a collaboration between 37 experts from 16 countries with expertise in health, nutrition, environmental sustainability, food systems, economics and political governance. Stockholm Resilience Centre was the scientific coordinator of the report.

Getting it seriously wrong
Human diets inextricably link health and environmental sustainability, and have the potential to nurture both. However, current diets are pushing the Earth beyond its planetary boundaries, while causing ill health. This puts both people and the planet at risk. Providing healthy diets from sustainable food systems is an immediate challenge as the population continues to grow – projected to reach 10 billion people by 2050 – and get wealthier (with the expectation of higher consumption of animal-based foods).

To meet this challenge, dietary changes must be combined with improved food production and reduced food waste. The authors stress that unprecedented global collaboration and commitment will be needed, alongside immediate changes such as refocussing agriculture to produce varied nutrient-rich crops, and increased governance of land and ocean use.

The food we eat and how we produce it determines the health of people and the planet, and we are currently getting this seriously wrong

Tim Lang, commission co-author, City, University of London, UK

Scientific targets for a healthy diet
Despite increased food production contributing to improved life expectancy and reductions in hunger, infant and child mortality rates, and global poverty over the past 50 years, these benefits are now being offset by global shifts towards unhealthy diets high in calories, sugar, refined starches and animal-based foods and low in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts and seeds, and fish.

The authors argue that the lack of scientific targets for a healthy diet have hindered efforts to transform the food system. Based on the best available evidence, the commission proposes a dietary pattern that meets nutritional requirements, promotes health, and allows the world to stay within planetary boundaries.

Compared with current diets, global adoption of the new recommendations by 2050 will require global consumption of foods such as red meat and sugar to decrease by more than 50%, while consumption of nuts, fruits, vegetables, and legumes must increase more than two-fold. Global targets will need to be applied locally – for example, countries in North America eat almost 6.5 times the recommended amount of red meat, while countries in South Asia eat only half the recommended amount. All countries are eating more starchy vegetables (potatoes and cassava) than recommended with intakes ranging from between 1.5 times above the recommendation in South Asia and by 7.5 times in sub-Saharan Africa.

“To be healthy, diets must have an appropriate calorie intake and consist of a variety of plant-based foods, low amounts of animal-based foods, unsaturated rather than saturated fats, and few refined grains, highly processed foods, and added sugars. The food group intake ranges that we suggest allow flexibility to accommodate various food types, agricultural systems, cultural traditions, and individual dietary preferences – including numerous omnivore, vegetarian, and vegan diets,” says co-lead commissioner Walter Willett from Harvard University.

The authors estimate that widespread adoption of such a diet would improve intakes of most nutrients. They also modelled the potential effects of global adoption of the diet on deaths from diet-related diseases. Three models each showed major health benefits, suggesting that adopting the new diet globally could avert between 10.9-11.6 million premature deaths per year – reducing adult deaths by between 19-23.6%.

Food sustainability
Since the mid-1950s, the pace and scale of environmental change has grown exponentially. Food production is the largest source of environmental degradation. To be sustainable, food production must occur within food-related planetary boundaries for climate change, biodiversity loss, land and water use, as well as for nitrogen and phosphorus cycles. However, production must also be sustainably intensified to meet the global population’s growing food demands.

”The shift towards sustainable food production will require decarbonising agricultural production by eliminating the use of fossil fuels and turn land use into a net carbon sink. In addition, we need to safeguard existing biodiversity, have no net expansion of cropland, and develop drastic improvements in fertiliser and water use efficiencies,” says commission co-author Line Gordon, director of the Stockholm Resilience Centre.

The authors estimate the minimum, unavoidable emissions of greenhouse gases if we are to provide healthy food for 10 billion people by 2050. They conclude that non-CO2 greenhouse gas emissions of methane and nitrous oxide will remain between 4.7-5.4 gigatonnes in 2050, with current emissions already at an estimated 5.2 gigatonnes in 2010. This suggests that the decarbonisation of the world energy system must progress faster than anticipated, to accommodate the need to healthily feed humans without further damaging the planet.

Phosphorus use must also be reduced (from 17.9 to between 6-16 teragrams), as must biodiversity loss (from 100 to between 1-80 extinctions per million species each year).

Based on their estimates, current levels of nitrogen, land and water use may be within the projected 2050 boundary (from 131.8 teragrams in 2010 to between 65-140 in 2050, from 12.6 M km2 in 2010 vs 11-15 M km2 in 2050, and from 1.8 M km3 in 2010 vs 1-4 M km3, respectively) but will require continued efforts to sustain this level. The boundary estimates are subject to uncertainty, and will require continuous update and refinement.

Using these boundary targets, the authors modelled various scenarios to develop a sustainable food system and deliver healthy diets by 2050. To stay within planetary boundaries, a combination of major dietary change, improved food production through enhanced agriculture and technology changes, and reduced food waste during production and at the point of consumption will be needed, and no single measure is enough to stay within all of the limits.

There is no silver bullet for combatting harmful food production practices, but by defining and quantifying a safe operating space for food systems, diets can be identified that will nurture human health and support environmental sustainability

Johan Rockström, co-lead commissioner, Stockholm Resilience Centre and the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research

Five strategies for change
The commission proposes five strategies to adjust what people eat and how it is produced:

1. Encourage people to choose healthier diets by improving availability and accessibility to healthy food. As this may increase costs to consumers, social protection for vulnerable groups may be required to avoid continued poor nutrition in low-income groups

2. Refocus agriculture from producing high volumes of crops to producing varied nutrient-rich ones. Global agriculture policies should incentivise producers to grow nutritious, plant-based foods, develop programmes that support diverse production systems, and increase research funding for ways to increase nutrition and sustainability

3. Sustainably intensify agriculture while taking into account local conditions to help apply appropriate agricultural practices and generate sustainable, high quality crops

4. Preserve natural ecosystems and ensure continued food supplies. This could be achieved through protecting intact natural areas on land (potentially through incentives), prohibiting land clearing, restoring degraded land, removing harmful fishing subsidies, and closing at least 10% of marine areas to fishing (including the high seas to create fish banks). “In fact, improved capture fisheries governance and reduced aquaculture footprints will be key in determining whether we succeed in maintaining seafood as a component of a healthy diet in the future”, says Beatrice Crona, report co-author, centre researcher and executive director of the GEDB programme at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences.

5. Half food waste. The majority of food waste occurs in low- and middle-income countries during food production due to poor harvest planning, lack of access to markets preventing produce from being sold, and lack of infrastructure to store and process foods. Improved investment in technology and education for farmers is needed. But food waste is also an issue in high-income countries, where it is primarily caused by consumers. This can be resolved through campaigns to improve shopping habits, help understand ‘best before’ and ‘use by’ dates, and improve food storage, preparation, portion sizes and use of leftovers.

Richard Horton, editor-in-chief at The Lancet, concludes:

“The transformation that the commission calls for is not superficial or simple, and requires a focus on complex systems, incentives, and regulations, with communities and governments at multiple levels having a part to play in redefining how we eat. Our connection with nature holds the answer, and if we can eat in a way that works for our planet as well as our bodies, the natural balance of the planet’s resources will be restored.””

This informative article was found at: stockholmresilience.org/research/research-news/2019-01-17-the-planetary-health-diet.html

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    Green catalysts with Earth-abundant metals accelerate production of bio-based plastic

    Green catalysts with Earth-abundant metals accelerate production of bio-based plastic

    How crystalline structure can affect the performance of MnO2 catalysts
    Date:January 7, 2019

    Source:
    Tokyo Institute of Technology
    Summary:
    Scientists have developed and analyzed a novel catalyst for the oxidation of 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, which is crucial for generating new raw materials that replace the classic non-renewable ones used for making many plastics.

    Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have developed and analyzed a novel catalyst for the oxidation of 5-hydroxymethyl furfural, which is crucial for generating new raw materials that replace the classic non-renewable ones used for making many plastics.

    It should be no surprise to most readers that finding an alternative to non-renewable natural resources is a key topic in current research. Some of the raw materials required for manufacturing many of today’s plastics involve non-renewable fossil resources, coal, and natural gas, and a lot of effort has been devoted to finding sustainable alternatives. 2,5-Furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) is an attractive raw material that can be used to create polyethylene furanoate, which is a bio-polyester with many applications.

    One way of making FDCA is through the oxidation of 5-hydroxymethyl furfural (HMF), a compound that can be synthesized from cellulose. However, the necessary oxidation reactions require the presence of a catalyst, which helps in the intermediate steps of the reaction so that the final product can be achieved.

    Many of the catalysts studied for use in the oxidation of HMF involve precious metals; this is clearly a drawback because these metals are not widely available. Other researchers have found out that manganese oxides combined with certain metals (such as iron and copper) can be used as catalysts. Although this is a step in the right direction, an even greater finding has been reported by a team of scientists from Tokyo Tech: manganese dioxide (MnO2) can be used by itself as an effective catalyst if the crystals made with it have the appropriate structure.

    The team, which includes Associate Professor Keigo Kamata and Professor Michikazu Hara, worked to determine which MnO2 crystal structure would have the best catalytic activity for making FDCA and why. They inferred through computational analyses and the available theory that the structure of the crystals was crucial because of the steps involved in the oxidation of HMF. First, MnO2 transfers a certain amount of oxygen atoms to the substrate (HMF or other by-products) and becomes MnO2-δ. Then, because the reaction is carried out under an oxygen atmosphere, MnO2-δ quickly oxidizes and becomes MnO2 again. The energy required for this process is related to the energy required for the formation of oxygen vacancies, which varies greatly with the crystal structure. In fact, the team calculated that active oxygen sites had a lower (and thus better) vacancy formation energy.

    To verify this, they synthesized various types of MnO2 crystals and then compared their performance through numerous analyses. Of these crystals, β-MnO2 was the most promising because of its active planar oxygen sites. Not only was its vacancy formation energy lower than that of other structures, but the material itself was proven to be very stable even after being used for oxidation reactions on HMF.

    The team did not stop there, though, as they proposed a new synthesis method to yield highly pure β-MnO2 with a large surface area in order to improve the FDCA yield and accelerate the oxidation process even further. “The synthesis of high-surface-area β-MnO2 is a promising strategy for the highly efficient oxidation of HMF with MnO2 catalysts,” states Kamata.

    With the methodological approach taken by the team, the future development of MnO2 catalysts has been kick-started. “Further functionalization of β-MnO2 will open up a new avenue for the development of highly efficient catalysts for the oxidation of various biomass-derived compounds,” concludes Hara. Researches such as this one ensure that renewable raw materials will be available to humankind to avoid all types of shortage crises.

    Story Source:

    Materials provided by Tokyo Institute of Technology. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

    Journal Reference:

    Eri Hayashi, Yui Yamaguchi, Keigo Kamata, Naoki Tsunoda, Yu Kumagai, Fumiyasu Oba, Michikazu Hara. Effect of MnO2 Crystal Structure on Aerobic Oxidation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural to 2,5-Furandicarboxylic Acid. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2019; DOI: 10.1021/jacs.8b09917

    Tokyo Institute of Technology. “Green catalysts with Earth-abundant metals accelerate production of bio-based plastic: How crystalline structure can affect the performance of MnO2 catalysts.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 January 2019. .

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      Seawater turns into freshwater through solar energy: A new low-cost technology

      According to FAO estimates, by 2025 nearly 2 billion people may not have enough drinking water to satisfy their daily needs. One of the possible solutions to this problem is desalination, namely treating seawater to make it drinkable. However, removing salt from seawater requires 10 to 1000 times more energy than traditional methods of freshwater supply, namely pumping water from rivers or wells.

      Motivated by this problem, a team of engineers from the Department of Energy of Politecnico di Torino has devised a new prototype to desalinate seawater in a sustainable and low-cost way, using solar energy more efficiently. Compared to previous solutions, the developed technology is in fact able to double the amount of water produced at given solar energy, and it may be subject to further efficiency improvement in the near future. The group of young researchers who recently published these results in the journal Nature Sustainability is composed of Eliodoro Chiavazzo, Matteo Morciano, Francesca Viglino, Matteo Fasano and Pietro Asinari (Multi-Scale Modeling Lab).

      The working principle of the proposed technology is very simple: “Inspired by plants, which transport water from roots to leaves by capillarity and transpiration, our floating device is able to collect seawater using a low-cost porous material, thus avoiding the use of expensive and cumbersome pumps. The collected seawater is then heated up by solar energy, which sustains the separation of salt from the evaporating water. This process can be facilitated by membranes inserted between contaminated and drinking water to avoid their mixing, similarly to some plants able to survive in marine environments (for example the mangroves),” explain Matteo Fasano and Matteo Morciano.

      While conventional ‘active’ desalination technologies need costly mechanical or electrical components (such as pumps and/or control systems) and require specialized technicians for installation and maintenance, the desalination approach proposed by the team at Politecnico di Torino is based on spontaneous processes occurring without the aid of ancillary machinery and can, therefore, be referred to as ‘passive’ technology. All this makes the device inherently inexpensive and simple to install and repair. The latter features are particularly attractive in coastal regions that are suffering from a chronic shortage of drinking water and are not yet reached by centralized infrastructures and investments.

      Up to now, a well-known disadvantage of ‘passive’ technologies for desalination has been the low energy efficiency as compared to ‘active’ ones. Researchers at Politecnico di Torino have faced this obstacle with creativity: “While previous studies focused on how to maximize the solar energy absorption, we have shifted the attention to a more efficient management of the absorbed solar thermal energy. In this way, we have been able to reach record values of productivity up to 20 litres per day of drinking water per square meter exposed to the Sun. The reason behind the performance increase is the ‘recycling’ of solar heat in several cascade evaporation processes, in line with the philosophy of ‘doing more, with less’. Technologies based on this process are typically called ‘multi-effect’, and here we provide the first evidence that this strategy can be very effective for ‘passive’ desalination technologies as well.”

      After developing the prototype for more than two years and testing it directly in the Ligurian sea (Varazze, Italy), the Politecnico’s engineers claim that this technology could have an impact in isolated coastal locations with little drinking water but abundant solar energy, especially in developing countries. Furthermore, the technology is particularly suitable for providing safe and low-cost drinking water in emergency conditions, for example in areas hit by floods or tsunamis and left isolated for days or weeks from electricity grid and aqueduct. A further application envisioned for this technology are floating gardens for food production, an interesting option especially in overpopulated areas. The researchers, who continue to work on this issue within the Clean Water Center at Politecnico di Torino, are now looking for possible industrial partners to make the prototype more durable, scalable and versatile. For example, engineered versions of the device could be employed in coastal areas where over-exploitation of groundwater causes the intrusion of saline water into freshwater aquifers (a particularly serious problem in some areas of Southern Italy), or could treat waters polluted by industrial or mining plants.

      Story Source:

      Materials provided by Politecnico di Torino. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

      Journal Reference:

      Eliodoro Chiavazzo, Matteo Morciano, Francesca Viglino, Matteo Fasano, Pietro Asinari. Passive solar high-yield seawater desalination by modular and low-cost distillation. Nature Sustainability, 2018; 1 (12): 763 DOI: 10.1038/s41893-018-0186-x
      Cite This Page:
      MLA
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      Politecnico di Torino. “Seawater turns into freshwater through solar energy: A new low-cost technology.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 7 January 2019. .

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        Recycling In Colorado Just Got Harder Thanks To New Restrictions From China – (A Better Title Would Be “Wishcylcing”)

        As a state, Colorado hasn’t been the greatest recycler. New restrictions imposed by China on contamination levels, mixed paper and plastics aren’t making things any easier.

        China used to be the leading re-manufacturer of recyclable material, and took in over half of America’s recycling. These new restrictions are not something the industry can easily rebound from. West Coast states that heavily rely on exporting their recyclables to China have even resorted to landfilling their materials. Colorado isn’t at that level yet, but the ripples of China’s decision are being felt around the state.

        Alpine Waste & Recycling is responsible for collecting the recyclables for the entire city of Denver. Brent Hildebrand, Alpine’s vice president of recycling, said they were shipping about 40 percent of their materials to foreign markets — the bulk going to China. So the new restrictions presented some challenges for Alpine.

        “We had to add some more labor to the system to help sort better and get some of the contaminants out of the stream,” Hildebrand said. “But then on top of that we had to slow down the system so the people could see the materials a little easier.”

        The new limit on recycling contaminants set by China is no more than 0.5 percent.

        Since January, Alpine has increased its workforce by 15 percent to keep up with the 0.5 percent contamination limit. Hildebrand said they’re still sending as much recycling as they can to China, but they’ve had to find new buyers in other countries to supplement.

        Brent Hildebrand, Vice President of Recycling for Alpine Waste and Recycling, June 19, 2018.
        Xandra McMahon/CPR News

        China is cracking down partly because American material recovery facilities have gotten a little lax about how much contamination goes into the recycling, said Wolf Kray with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. For example, anytime a stray red Solo cup ended up in a bale of mixed paper, the materials were contaminated.

        “Because the markets have been so high and there’s been such a demand from China,” Kray said. “We haven’t done the best job necessarily as far as limiting the waste that’s gone into the recycling stream.”

        And that “we” includes not just the processing facilities but also anyone who might not be recycling in the most diligent way. Colorado has a problem with what the industry likes to call “wishcycling.” Since there’s no set standard, Kray said it can be tricky to know what each program does and does not accept. “It varies even in the metro area,” he said.

        Things We Shouldn’t Be Tossing In Our Purple Bins… But Probably Are*
        Styrofoam
        Crinkly Plastic Cups (Red Solo Cups)
        Food Take Out Containers
        Plastic Film Wrap (Saran Wrap)
        Scrap Metal (Broken Utensils, Old Cookie Sheets)
        Plastic Grocery Bags
        *Recyclables vary by collector statewide. Be sure to check with your local operator for acceptable items.
        “There’s a lot of wishful recycling that goes on where people assume that if it’s got the recycling arrows on it that means it’s automatically a recyclable material and that’s certainly not the case,” Kray pointed out.

        Even if the recognizable arrows are there, it doesn’t mean a facility can process or re-sell it. Some things recyclers get are not as questionable. At the Boulder County Recycling Center, conservation manager Darla Arians pointed out every time a shocking object came down the conveyor belt where workers were sorting.

        “You can see that huge piece of metal he just pulled out!” she exclaimed. “That would destroy our OCC screen — our cardboard screen — which is the first piece of equipment that the material hits. If that had gone past him, the facility would have to shut down.”

        Another way Alpine and other haulers across the state are handling these changes? They’re shipping material to Boulder County. Boulder has become a popular spot thanks to a new plastic sorting machine and the facility’s reliance on American buyers. They’ve been able to save more money than other recyclers around the state, putting Boulder in a position where they can help other haulers.

        “Our inbound tonnage has gone up around 1,500 to 2,000 tons per month from other MRFs and haulers in the region because our gate fees are lower here than they are elsewhere,” she said.

        In a millisecond, Boulder’s plastic sorting machine is able to tell the difference between a milk jug and a shampoo bottle using infrared detection. It then uses its 100-horse power air jet to shoot the material into the right container. The machine sorts more efficiently than any person, and Arians said a few are considering “this type of equipment, and with the new restrictions from China, they pretty much have to in order to keep up.”

        Boulder County’s Conservation Manager Darla Arians inside the county’s recycling center, June 22, 2018.

        Xandra McMahon/CPR News

        Ninety-eight percent of Boulder’s material goes to American buyers for remanufacturing. Even with Boulder taking other counties’ materials, many are still scrambling to find new markets for a lot of it.

        “You have essentially this big buildup of all the recyclables that are still getting collected and stored at recycling centers that need to go somewhere,” CDPHE’s Wolf Kray said. “So, because there’s more generation, essentially it’s devaluing the prices so that’s tough for the recyclers who aren’t making as much money on the actual end products when they sell them.”

        Market values for recycled paper, plastics, aluminum, etc. have plummeted since restrictions went into place. That affects all recyclers, even ones like Boulder County that export very little because they sell most of their material stateside.

        “If we get to the point where we’re getting a zero dollar or we were gonna be charged for a particular type of material, then we will hold on to it for 30 days and see what sort of pricing we can get in the next month,” Arians said.

        For Kray, the solution lies in developing and bolstering domestic markets for recyclables. To that end, CDPHE offers grants to organizations to help develop recycling infrastructure in the state. In 2017, the program handed out 22 grants that went as high as $400,000. An Iowa company called Rewall that buys waste and turns it into building material is expanding to Colorado with the help of the grant program.

        Another solution Kray mentioned has to do with the three R’s everyone learned in elementary school — reduce, reuse and recycle. Kray said there should be more emphasis on the first two and less reliance on the third.

        this article provided by Colorado Public Radio New <Colorado-Just-Got-Harder-Thanks-To-New-Restrictions-From-China>

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          Denver Salon is Honored as an Environmental Leader by The ELP

          My Hair Trip Salon Denver, along with 167 other Colorado companies has been recognized as an environmental leader in the state of Colorado in 2018.

          DENVER – The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has recognized 168 companies on Oct. 9, 2018 for outstanding environmental achievements that help keep Colorado a desirable place to work and live. The department, in partnership with the Pollution Prevention Advisory Board and the Colorado Environmental Partnership, presented the 19th annual Environmental Leadership Awards at the Infinity Event Center in Glendale. More than 400 government, business and community leaders attended.

          The awards recognized Colorado organizations with gold, silver and bronze designations for voluntarily going beyond compliance with state and federal regulations and for their commitment to continual environmental improvement.

          “We are proud to recognize all of Colorado’s environmental leaders and work with them to reduce barriers to innovation while protecting public health and the environment,” said Karin McGowan, the department’s interim executive director.
          This year’s program will recognize 12 new Gold Leaders, 12 new Silver Partners and 16 new Bronze Achievers. The new Gold Leaders include My Hair Trip Salon Denver, Castle Rock Water, Ela Family Farms, Clifton Sanitation District and Xcel Energy.

          The 2018 24-Karat Gold Award winner will be named at the event. Chosen by other Gold leaders, 24-Karat Gold Award winners are individuals or teams who have gone above and beyond required job duties to create and implement a program or initiative that made a measurable contribution to the environment, the economy and society. The Colorado Environmental Leadership Program is open to all Colorado businesses, industries, offices, educational institutions, municipalities, government agencies, communities, nonprofits and other organizations.

          For a complete list of organizations with gold, silver and bronze designations and summaries of their environmental efforts, please contact Lynette Myers, Environmental Leadership Program manager, at lynette.myers@state.co.us, or visit the department’s Environmental Leadership Program website.

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            Proud Partners of Green Circle Salons

            As Colorado’s #1 rated Organic Salon and the state’s #1 rated eco-friendly salon we are so proud to be members of the Green Circle Salons community with like-minded beauty shops all around the world!

            A little about our wonderful partners; Green Circle Salons:

            Green Circle Salons provides the world’s first, and North America’s only, sustainable salon solution to recover and repurpose beauty waste ensuring that we can help keep people and the planet beautiful.

            We are able to transform beauty waste into a desirable commodity through an award-winning platform built by the industry, for the industry. Our turnkey program allows salons to repurpose and recover up to 95% of the resources that were once considered waste; materials such as hair, leftover hair color, foils, color tubes, aerosol cans, paper and plastics.

            Our platform is designed to support salons in four key areas; to be green, to build a recurring revenue, to gain clients, and to save money. We do this in a way that is simple, open and honest – everyone is involved, and everyone wins.

            Today more than ever, consumers vote with their dollars and channel spending into responsible brands that support healthy communities. Literally overnight, our program adds layers of value that enhance both customer and staff experience, and publicly position our member salons as responsible stewards of our planet.

            Through My Hair Trip The Organic Salon Denver’s partnerships with incredible organizations like Green Circle Salons and Certifiably Green Denver and The Colorado Environmental Leadership Program this revolutionary green eco-salon has become the most highly recognized sustainable salon in Denver, Colorado! We cannot really explain how humbling that is and how grateful we are with our team, partners, clients, families and friends, to be at the forefront of this amazing movement that is growing more and more everyday!

            For more information on Green Circle Salons check them out at https://greencirclesalons.com/

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              We love Davines

              Davines is the #1 sustainable beauty line in the world and you can get it at Denver, Colorado’s #1 rated sustainable salon!

              Here’s some of the reasons we love partnering with Davines!

              They Help Plant Fruit Trees Around the World
              Every April, The Davines Group encourages their salons to fundraise for The Fruit Tree Planting Foundation, a nonprofit charity that helps provide food and income generation to communities and families in need around the world. This year, the proceeds will go to planting 5,000 trees in Peru. Davines and The Fruit Tree Planting Foundation will choose the salon that has the most creative and successful fundraising efforts, and the team members of the winning salon will go to the South American country to help plant the trees alongside the families who receive them.

              They’ve Been a Certified B Corp Since 2016
              Becoming a Certified B Corp is no easy task! The Davines Group went through a rigorous assessment by nonprofit B Lab®, which evaluated its performance in the areas of employees, environment, governance, community, and customers and ensured it was creating a positive impact on the world economically, socially, and environmentally. It encompasses everything you could imagine: from the types of cars their team drives, the paper the office uses, how employees volunteer, and more! For Davines, becoming a Certified B Corp fits perfectly into its vision of sustainable beauty.

              They’re Using Your Hair Clippings To Clean Up the Globe
              Davines has partnered with Green Circle Salons to work toward turning salons into a zero-impact industry, which means reducing and offsetting CO2 emissions. Almost everything in a salon can be taken into consideration and reused—even the hair that falls to the floor during a cut, which can be used to help soak up an environmental oil spill.

              They Incorporate Slow Foods
              Have you checked out your Davines ingredient list lately? In collaboration with Slow Food Foundation for Biodiversity, each of Davines’ nine product families that are a part of the Essential Haircare line includes one active ingredient from a Slow Food Presidium. Take one of our favorites, Davines LOVE Smoothing Conditioner: It’s made with olive extract from the farm of Mr. Carmelo Messina in a small area of Italy called Ficarra.

              Their Packaging Is So Much More Than Meets the Eye
              The packaging for Davines’ Essential Haircare line is not only chic, but it’s also ready for its next incarnation. The packaging is made out of reusable, food-grade materials, but also can be reused easily by you! Check out these adorable and easy to make succulent pots.

              There’s Even a Davines Coffee (Yes, Please!)
              You can up your Davines morning routine via its Caffe Vita farm direct coffee collaboration. Just like Davines’ luxe ingredient notes, this one features hints of toasted almonds, caramel, smooth dark chocolate, and hints of bright strawberries. I’ll take a large, please!

              Hooray for Davines!

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                Colorado’s #1 rated organic / eco-friendly salon

                My Hair Trip Salon Denver is so happy and proud to be Colorado’s #1 rated organic salon and Colorado’s #1 rated eco-friendly salon. A lot of hard work and dedication have gone into My Hair Trip’s climb to success. The key has always been love, love for our clients, love for each other, love for the earth and love for Colorado!

                My Hair Trip Salon in Denver is also the only salon and the only business from the beauty industry in the state of Colorado to be recognized as members of the Colorado Environmental Leadership Program. The Environmental Leadership Program (ELP) is our statewide environmental recognition and reward program which offers benefits and incentives to members that voluntarily go beyond compliance with state and federal regulations and are committed to continual environmental improvement.

                My Hair Trip Organic Salon Denver is also a certified green business through the Certifiably Green Denver office who offers free sustainability advising services to Denver’s business community. Expert advisors help businesses achieve their sustainability goals and find opportunities to conserve resources while reducing costs in five areas: energy, water, waste, transportation and business management practices. Businesses may elect to receive help with specific initiatives or gain recognition for their achievements by becoming a Certified Green Business.

                If you ever take a minute to check out some of My Hair Trip’s customer reviews and ratings you will notice a difference in reviews left for My Hair Trip in comparison to most other salons. Our customer’s reviews are usually much longer and much more in depth than reviews of other salons in Denver and in Colorado. We believe this is because we are unique in the magnitude of our service. We have built our team of highly trained, highly skilled, highly talented stylists and customer service professionals who are not only incredible craftsmen but also have a natural, innate ability to listen, understand and to care for our clients and for each other.

                Come check out My Hair Trip, The Organic Salon in Denver, and feel the difference.
                Look Good. Feel Good. Be Good. My Hair Trip Salon Denver.

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                  Organic Hair Color in Denver, Colorado

                  At Denver’s highest rated 5-star organic hair salon and beauty shop we are the only salon team in Colorado to offer Organic Colour Systems! OCS is the only professional color line in the world that is 100% ammonia free.

                  Healthy hair:
                  The Natural Alternative
                  Most hair colour products use harsh chemicals like ammonia that damage hair in the colouring process, stripping hair’s natural health and shine.

                  Organic Colour Systems is different. We’re kind to hair and it shows.

                  By using more certified organic ingredients and fewer chemicals than anyone else we’ve created an effective way to colour hair as naturally as possible.

                  With Outstanding Results
                  And because hair responds better to natural ingredients our products give outstanding results.

                  Our unique approach is gentler on hair and locks in colour, moisture and goodness to every strand.

                  So hair looks naturally healthier and glossier with radiant colour.

                  Made in Britain with TLC
                  (Tender Loving Colour)
                  Combining the best of British know-how and natural ingredients we create Tender Loving Colour with absolutely no ammonia, resorcinol or parabens.

                  We make our beautiful hair products in the heart of the New Forest in Hampshire using lots of lovely natural, organic ingredients.

                  With Organic Colour Systems hair is naturally healthier.

                  Why Organic Colour Systems?

                  The system:
                  “Organic Colour Systems is more than outstanding products – it’s a system of total hair care. Used together, its ranges deliver outstanding results with coloured hair.

                  Every product in every range is specially formulated to work together for naturally healthier hair and longer-lasting colour.

                  It works because it’s gentle and
                  non-damaging

                  The system is designed to treat coloured hair gently at every stage of every treatment from shampooing to styling.

                  Most other hair care products use chemicals that strip hair of colour and health as they style, perm and straighten.

                  Organic Colour Systems takes a different approach. With Organic Colour Systems every product in every range contains the minimum of chemicals and the maximum of certified organic ingredients.

                  And because all of the OCS products are gentle and non-damaging to hair, hair looks healthier and colour stays locked in. Plus, all of the products can safely be used together.

                  The care range and colour range
                  work together
                  The Organic Colour Systems care range and colour range work together for outstanding results.

                  Our uniquely natural shampoos and reconstructors soften the hair before colouring and gently open up the outer layer (cuticle) so colour is easily absorbed.

                  Then our nourishing conditioners close the cuticle completely, and restore hair to its natural pH value. That means colour stays locked in and hair looks smooth and shiny.

                  Our care range products also contain natural UV light filters to protect hair and keep colour longer-lasting.

                  Nourishes, protects and strengthens coloured hair
                  All our products are packed with natural moisturisers and proteins that nourish, protect and strengthen coloured hair during every process from shampooing to straightening. So hair looks healthier than ever.

                  Even damaged hair can safely be coloured and styled with Organic Colour Systems. Our uniquely nourishing and strengthening formulations work together across all ranges to repair damaged hair in a short time.

                  With our flexible system, hair in any condition can be successfully coloured, styled, straightened or permed. And these processes can be done one after the other without causing any damage to the hair.

                  Naturally styled, permed and
                  straightened hair
                  Our control range is rich in natural conditioners that add extra body, hold and shine, and protect hair during styling. It doesn’t matter how often hair is styled, it won’t get damaged.

                  Our straightening system uses a natural product, keratin, to straighten and condition hair at the same time. And our perm system is uniquely gentle and natural for natural, healthy looking curls.

                  Thanks to our unique system, all our products are safe to use on coloured hair and work together to create long-lasting colour and healthy hair.”

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                    10 Beauty Foods For Glowing Skin And Shiny Hair

                    “Beauty from the inside out is what we’re going for with a healthy lifestyle.

                    Rather than looking to your vanity table for a beauty fix, take a look in your kitchen — you might be surprised how much what you eat can affect your skin and hair!

                    1. Dark chocolate

                    Contrary to popular belief, chocolate does not cause acne. In fact, research has shown that dark chocolate even protects skin from sun damage. Chocolate, or rather raw cacao, contains anti-aging antioxidants called flavonoids, which fight free radicals to protect your skin from UV damage and prevent the appearance of wrinkles, fine lines, and skin discolorations.

                    Chocolate also makes you feel happy — when you eat it, the brain releases endorphins, your body’s natural feel-good chemical, and phenylethylamine, which elicits the head-over-heels feeling of falling in love. When you feel good, you look good.

                    2. Walnuts

                    Walnuts contain nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E that help your skin stay smooth and plump. Walnuts also protect your hair from sun damage and keep it lustrous and shiny. Get your daily dose of by eating a handful raw or throwing some chopped walnuts in your salad, pasta or dessert.

                    3. Spinach

                    Spinach contains a triple dose of wrinkle-fighting antioxidants: vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene. These all work together to protect your skin from the sun’s aging UV rays (but you should still wear sunscreen, of course). Enjoy spinach in salads, green smoothies, or lightly sautéed with coconut oil, garlic and a dash of sea salt.

                    4. Lentils

                    These legumes are a good source of protein and iron, which support full-bodied hair. Enjoy them as a side dish, in a hearty soup, or make your own lentil-veggie burgers.

                    5. Chia seeds

                    These tiny seeds are packed with protein, fiber, and loads of omega-3s — all great for your skin and hair. Since chia seeds absorb up to 12 times their weight in water, they also keep you feeling fuller longer. Enjoy them as a pudding, in smoothies, or as an egg substitute in vegan baking.

                    6. Almonds

                    Almonds are rich in flavonoids and vitamin E, which is vital to skin health. They can help ward off damaging free radicals and even oxidative damage caused by smoking. Almonds also make a great source of satisfying fiber and protein, and their manganese and selenium content helps keep your hair shiny. Snack on a handful of almonds, or enjoy them in almond butter spread on apple slices.

                    7. Flaxseeds

                    Flaxseeds provide a huge boost of omega-3 fatty acids, which are beyond good for you. Preliminary studies have shown that both omega-6 and omega- 3 fatty acids help prevent or treat skin conditions like acne and eczema. The anti-inflammatory properties of omega-3s can also maintain a healthy rate of skin cell renewal. To ensure your body absorbs all these beauty-boosting benefits, eat flaxseeds in ground or “meal” form.

                    8. Avocados

                    Avocados are the ultimate “get gorgeous” food. Ever seen shampoos or facial masks using avocados? There’s a reason for that.

                    Key for hair, skin, and nails, the monounsaturated fatty acids packed into these creamy treats not only help lower bad cholesterol levels, but also reduce the appearance of aging in skin. Avocados also contain antioxidants, fiber, potassium, magnesium, and folate, and one avocado is packed with more potassium than a medium banana — nearly 700 milligrams! Eat avocado in guacamole, sliced on top of a salad or sandwich, or even with a spoon — we won’t judge.

                    9. Berries

                    Berries are loaded with anti-inflammatory agents and vitamins that help protect you from premature aging. The antioxidants in berries help minimize the damage of free radicals, which can accelerate wrinkle formation and cause disease. Additionally, berries are packed with vitamin C, which keeps skin firm and strong. Also known as ascorbic acid, vitamin C is essential to the production of collagen, a protein that aids in the growth of cells and blood vessels. Eat a handful of your favorite berry with breakfast, or pureed into a smoothie.

                    10. Seaweed

                    Sea vegetables like nori or wakame are loaded with iron and phytonutrients. All of these nutrients can help you attain gorgeous, supple skin. Iron, manganese, iodine, copper, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids, and selenium — all found in sea vegetables — are essential for gorgeous hair, skin, and nails. Enjoy these in mixed green salads, toss some wakame into your miso soup, or wrap up some veggies in nori sheets to make nori rolls.”

                    This article and more found ~ here ~

                    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/thrive-market/beauty-foods-for-glowing-skin-shiny-hair_b_7192880.html

                    Photo credit: Paul Delmont, Thrive Market

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