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Non-toxic Hair Color in Denver?

Naturally Better Colour
Organic Colour Systems is the first-ever range of permanent colours made from the maximum amount of certified organic ingredients and the minimum amount of chemicals… to colour hair as naturally as possible.

Our unique approach is gentle but effective and easily colours even resistant grey hair.

And because hair responds better to natural ingredients it looks naturally healthier and glossier with radiant, longer-lasting colour.

Naturally Healthier Hair
Most hair colour products use harsh chemicals like ammonia that damage hair in the colouring process, stripping hair’s natural health and shine.

Organic Colour Systems is different. We’re kind to hair and it shows.

By using fewer chemicals and no ammonia, Organic Colour Systems maintains hair’s essential protein and moisture balance.

And it doesn’t damage hair in the colouring process.

Our unique colour and care system restores even damaged hair, giving it healthier body, suppleness and shine.

Colour without limits
Versatile, with easy colour correction, Organic Colour Systems takes the limits off creativity imposed by inflexible, harsh chemical products.

It’s easy to create fiery reds, intense coppers, rich golds, auburn browns, frosty platinums and an incredible range of natural tones.

What’s more, with Organic Colour Systems colours are true to the colour chart and stay locked-in for longer.

The Full Range
The full range is made up of 64 fully intermixable colours and concentrates; plus a selection of Activators, 2 Lightening powders and oil.

What color line does your salon use? Alfaparf Milano? Redkin? Matrix? Schwarzkopf? keune? Goldwell? Box color? You are causing real harm to, not only your hair, but to your overall health as well! your salon or stylist might be telling you their line is “ammonia free” or that it has minimal amounts of ammonia or that it is healthy for you and your hair, or that it is healthier than it once was, or that organic color doesn’t work… Do your research, they are not being honest with you. It’s your health and your body. if you are wondering about organic beauty or have questions about the brands being used on you, give us a ring, we’ve done the research and would be happy to help!

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    “The Health Effects of Hair Coloring” with traditional chemical-based hair dyes

    The Health Effects of Hair Coloring with chemical-based hair dyes

    “The health effects of hair coloring are, to a certain extent, unknown. And the link between hair coloring and cancer is controversial and, to date, inconclusive. But many of the chemicals contained in frequently used hair dyes have been shown to be dangerous. Such chemicals can cause allergic reactions and perhaps even neurological problems.

    There are alternatives to such hair dyes, such as plant-based henna and infrared techniques that open up hair shafts to allow coloring. Such “green” solutions are advisable for anyone who wants to avoid the risks associated with many hair coloring products.

    Types of Chemically Based Hair Coloring
    There are three main types of chemically based hair coloring products, as explained by Surviving-Hairloss.com. Temporary hair dyes are like surface paint: They don’t penetrate the hair shaft and are easily washed off. Semi-permanent dyes contain smaller molecules that do penetrate the hair shaft. Permanent dyes use the harshest products, which break up the original color pigment in your hair and replace it.

    Potentially Dangerous Chemicals in Hair Coloring Products
    Chemicals in hair coloring products include PPD, or para-phenylenediamine, which can cause allergic reactions such as burning and headaches and is also a potential carcinogen; coal tar, which is in 70 percent of hair coloring products and can cause allergic reactions; lead acetate, which has been banned in European countries as a possible carcinogen and, as with, other lead products, may cause potentially serious neurological problems; DMDM hydantoin, a preservative that has been linked to immune system problems; ammonia, which can be toxic and corrosive and may cause respiratory problems; and resorcinol, which can be an irritant and is a potential carcinogen.

    Hair Coloring and Cancer Risks
    A potential link between hair-coloring and cancer has been debated for years. The American Cancer Society states, “The evidence from these studies remain quite inconclusive. Most of the available evidence does not support a link to cancer risk. Those studies that do show a link find that it is too weak to be considered a major public health concern.”

    A study from the University of Southern California in 2001 found a doubling of the rate of bladder cancer for women who regularly used permanent dye on their hair, as well as for hair stylists who worked with such dyes. However, those results were not replicated in subsequent studies.

    The American Cancer Society believes that larger studies are needed and notes that some ingredients in hair coloring products have caused cancer in lab animals.

    Hair Coloring and Other Health Risks
    Chemically based hair coloring products can cause allergic reactions leading to severe skin and eye irritations, according to the American Cancer Society. In rare cases, the eye irritations can lead to blindness. Such products should be tested on a small patch of skin before they are used on the hair and scalp.

    Considerations
    Chemically based hair coloring products contain some nasty stuff. There are perfectly good substitutes, such as plant-based henna dye, that don’t contain such risks. You can avoid any potential health risks associated with hair coloring by choosing products that are not only safer but also environmentally friendly. Call it a win-win solution.”

    My Hair Trip Salon Denver offers alternatives to traditional, chemical-based hair dye systems, and is Denver’s highest rated eco-friendly salon and spa.

    References: http://www.livestrong.com/article/211736-the-health-effects-of-hair-coloring/
    Surviving-Hairloss.com: How Much Do You Know About Hair Coloring?
    USC News: Study Points to Bladder Cancer Risk From Long-term Hair Dye Use
    American Cancer Society: Hair Dyes

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      Meet our newest stylist / makeup artist: Brittany Chavez

      Brittany Chavez graduated from Empire Beauty in September of 2009. She has wanted to be a stylist since she was 16 years old. She has always loved how fun and artistic the beauty industry can be, and she can’t imagine doing anything else in life. Helping others feel amazing about themselves is Brittany’s favorite part of her job.
      Brittany feels strongly convicted to always proceed in continuing her education as a stylist and in staying on top of current trends, so she can make sure she’s able to give her clients the look and feel they desire every time.

      Brittany had the amazing opportunity of working on the Noveau team at Intercouiffure in NYC, which is one of the most prestigious major events a hair stylists can participate in. She was able to work backstage and onstage at the event. She has also been a helping hand at Denver Fashion Week assisting with hair as well as Second Home Spring fashion show applying makeup, another passion of hers. If its fun and challenging you can bet she will be there!

      Brittany started her career at Antoine Du Chez. She began as an assistant going through their advanced training program, as a cutting specialist. After spending time there, she decided to take on a new challenge, learning the ins and outs of coloring hair. Brittany has always picked up on things quickly and is a fast learner.

      Brittany, her two young boys and husband have all been making the organic , green transition over the past 6 months. This lifestyle became important to her after she had her children. When she found out about My Hair Trip, she was determined to become apart of the team! Brittany is excited for this experience, and happy to have finally found a salon home.

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        Meet the Owner, Master Stylist / Colorist – Nicole Zamora

        Nicole Zamora started My Hair Trip more than a decade ago and built her clientele with her salon customers, fashion designers, photographers, models, media, and talent agencies.

        In October of 2009, she made the move to downtown Denver! So far, since getting to the city in 2009, she has been involved in numerous fashion shows around the city, as well as a plethora of fundraisers, and educational programs and events.

        Now in March of 2014 she has opened her very own hair salon! where she is surrounded by other motivated and talented stylists.

        Nicole always knew Green, eco-friendly, organic living was something she wanted to incorporate into her salon. Through years of independent research, training, and education, Nicole finally had everything she needed to open Colorado’s very first totally Organic Hair Salon.

        Now Nicole’s salon, My Hair Trip Salon Denver, is Colorado’s only certified green, eco-friendly, organic hair salon, art gallery, and jewelry and apparel boutique!

        Nicole and her husband / business partner, Paul Sr. are in the process of building their dream team, and thus far, are so proud to have been lucky enough to find Sonia, Amber, Thomas, Erica, Gail, Kristi, D’ona and Kelly!

        So check out My Hair Trip Salon Denver at 8th and Santa Fe in the 80204 in the Denver Art District!

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          2015 Hair Color Trends

          These are the hottest hair color trends of 2015, so get your Pinterest finger ready!

          Baby Lights Hair Color Trend: Move over, ombre! There’s a new hair color trend in town, and it goes by the name “babylights.”

          Babylights are reminiscent of the soft, sunkissed strands that graced your hair as a child. To achieve this look, pair finely woven highlights with handpainted pieces for a dimensional, yet subtle glow around the face and ends.

          As the name may infer, Babylights have the ability to add a hint of youth to your client’s overall appearance.“Never doubt the power of a few face framing highlights.” [Click to Tweet this quote] Babylights are particularly low maintenance, and can be done on all hair types, making it a great choice for almost anyone who sits in your chair.

          The key with this hair color trend is to find the delicate balance between placement and natural color graduation. Unlike your ombré technique, bold and high contrasting root to end colors with lines of demarcation are not the goal.

          We recommend microhighlighting in small sections where you need control (face + crown), and using your baylayage technique through the mids and ends to keep the final look as natural looking as possible.

          PRO TIP: Be sure your lighter pieces aren’t lifted too high – a safe rule of the thumb is to make your highlights about 2 shades lighter than your base color.

          Color of the year: Marsala!

          According to Pantone, an expert color company, 2015’s Color of the Year is Marsala – a robust and earthy wine red. Elegant and multifaceted, Marsala can act as a bold statement color or complementary tone for many of your browns and reds.

          Let’s explore how this trend could manifest itself in hair color:

          Aubergine Hair Color

          Aubergine appears on the very violet spectrum of your wine reds. Its deep plum and dark red hues resemble that of a young, full-bodied wine.

          This hair color trend is extremely versatile and can look great on all skin tones. For cooler complexions, focus on your purple, eggplant hues; for warmer skin tones, add a few brownish-red colors to ensure skin does not appear yellow or sallow.

          “I love formulating this hair color for my darker leveled clients,” says Organic Color Systems’ Technical Director, Rebecca Gregory, “Aubergine is the perfect complementary color for cool or neutral brunettes living at levels 4 and below.”

          Merlot Hair Color

          Much like the wine, Merlot is a rich red color with subtle hints of cherry and cocoa. This vibrant shade contains equal parts violet and red, and much like Aubergine, can be easily modified to suit all skin tones.

          In 2015, you’ll find requests for all over colors to be a rarity – most everyone is looking for a little pop or dimension. That being said, Merlot is the perfect color pairing for brown-based reds, and can be used as a deep lowlight or in slices to create beautifully dimensional redheads, which are also on very on trend.

          Rose Gold Tones

          Rose gold isn’t just for blondes, though lightening powder is usually required!

          These gorgeous pinkish copper tones can be accomplished on almost all hair colors. However, in order to achieve this highly sought after hair color trend, you will need to pre-lighten or begin depositing on levels 8 and higher.

          PRO TIP: For longer lasting rose gold hues, try using the gold-yellow pigment present after lifting hair to a level 8 or 9. By not lifting past a level 9, pH and protein levels stay in tact, allowing for a longer lasting color service.

          Rich Brunettes with Caramel Highlights

          It’s a classic, but a rich chocolate brown hair color with caramel highlights is a great choice for brunette clients who crave dimension without commitment.

          PRO TIP: If you’re looking for a beautiful brown base color to pair with caramel highlights, look to your mochas and neutrals. Too cool of browns can cause your hair color to appear dull and flat.

          However, don’t be afraid to mix caramel tones in with your soft, beige blondes for an ultra sophisticated look. Copper hues are trending for all almost hair colors this season.

          Whether you’re formulating for apricot blondes, spicy reds, or dimensional brunettes, copper tones are the perfect partner for hair colors with a golden hue. This hair color trend is best suited for netural to warm complexions with gold, peach or yellow undertones.

          Silver Fox

          Remember when clients just wanted to cover greys? For Hair Stylists and clients alike, pesky silver strands were once considered enemy number one.

          However, in 2015, showing off silver hair will be anything but unacceptable for clients of all ages.

          Organic Colorist, Sarah Whitesell says, “I’ve seen more of my mature clients being taken from all over grey coverage to actually letting their beautiful silvers and greys show by complimenting them with sandy blondes tones to create natural, soft dimension.”

          Blending silvers with blonde is a striking combination, but never doubt the beauty of a front-facing silver streak paired with a dark brown base.

          PRO TIP: Depending on your percentage and type of naturally silver hair, texture can be wiry and unruly. Be sure to conduct a Wet Stretch Test prior to your color application, as a moisturizing treatment might be needed to soften the cuticle.

          On one of the end spectrum, silver can be used subtly to create an overall natural look, but to adapt this color for your edgier clients, look to your blue-based colors to achieve an all over fashion color.

          PRO TIP: For an all over application, you’ll need to pre-lighten the hair to a very pale yellow (so keep those protein treatments handy)!

          Gray Hair Color Trend

          Quite possibly the perfect color accessory for Silver Fox, dark grey and charcoal hair colors will continue to trend upward this season.

          Your hair color formulas can be tweaked to reveal cooler, slate-like hues or warmer, beige greys – all are on trend. In fact, we recommend baylayaging a few different types of grey and silver to create a highly dimensional fashion hair color.

          If you’re looking to create a grey look for your mature clients, look for predominantly warmer tones, since they are more naturally occurring than blue-greys, and natural grey hair lacks gold pigment.

          Platinum Princess

          Last year, platinum blonde was one of the most popular hair color trends with celebrities like Anne Hathaway and Jennifer Lawrence opting to join the light side. As a salon professional, you know bold hair color trends sported by celebrities will trickle their way into the salon, eventually. On that note, we predict 2015 hair color trends will continue to see a rise in platinum blondes locks for those that weren’t quite ready in previous years.

          PRO TIP: While platinum blonde in the 90’s was distinguished by golden undertones (we’re looking at you, Justin Timberlake), 2015’s platinum is more modern and chic. Be sure to to lift the hair to a very pale yellow and cancel warm tones accordingly.

          This is a great opportunity to introduce clients to a much needed silver shampoo!

          Metallic Pastels

          In recent years, we’ve seen a rise in demand for fun and flirty pastel hair colors like bubblegum pink and lavender. But just like any hair trend, styles evolve and it’s our job as stylists to stay updated.

          Expect matte pastels to take on a lustrous life of their own with a new focus on shiny, metallic finishes. For strands to reflect these shimmery tones, hair must be kept as healthy as possible. Since nearly all pastel hair colors require a lifting process, protein and moisture treatments will be a necessary component of this trend.

          PRO TIP: For added sheen, be sure to experiment with your gold and silver additives.

          Get these and all your color needs in 2015 met at Denver’s Organic Hair Salon: My Hair Trip Salon Denver – 773 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, CO, 80204

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            Eco-friendly Salon in Denver

            There is an eco friendly hair salon in Denver, CO.

            Denver, CO has become a beacon of a certain kind of lifestyle on the national and even, the global scene. People are flocking to Denver, and Colorado from all over for the promise and opportunity that our wonderful city and state can provide.

            The beauty of the rockies, the clean air 5,280 feet above sea level, our culture and attitude, all of these are reasons people are loving Denver right now.

            Colorado is also at the forefront of sustainability when it comes to green businessess and organic food policies. In Denver the focus on a sustainable state is apparent to even casual observers.

            Now Denver also can boast a totally green, organic hair salon too. My Hair Trip Salon Denver is an officially certified and registered green business. My Hair Trip Salon Denver offers its clients all organic products and services. The salon’s slogan is Look Good. Feel Good. Be Good. and that is what they try to achieve according to the owner, 32 year-old, Nicole Zamora. “We are passionate about our salon being more than just a beauty shop, we use our business as a platform to truly transform peoples lives from the inside out, so their true beauty can shine!”

            My Hair Trip, Denver’s premier eco-friendly salon could not be in a better spot. The local, family-owned salon at 8th and Santa Fe, in the Denver Art District in downtown Denver, has been turning out happy clients who love what all natural products and services can do for their hair.

            This green, eco-friendly salon in Denver has a clear focus on customer service, from the moment you walk in the door you are greeted with a smile and clients’ need are constantly attended to.

            If you are interested in organic hair care or organic health and beauty, this eco-friendly salon in Denver has got what you are looking for.

            Check out My Hair Trip Salon Denver at 773 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, CO, 80204.

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              Not all Ammonia-Free Color is Created Equal

              Before we jump to any conclusions, one should know the differences among the salon industry’s top professional color lines – not all ammonia-free hair color is created equal.

              First, let’s quickly remind ourselves the part ammonia plays in hair color:

              Ammonia’s primary function is to raise the pH of the hair, open the cuticle, and allow for color to enter the cortex. The more ammonia in a color product, the higher the pH of the hair will become and the wider the cuticle will open.

              The average working pH of hair processed with ammoniated hair color is 10-11, while the natural isometric pH of hair is 4.5-5.5!

              NOTE: The pH scale is logarithmic, meaning with each rise in pH level, the new level is 10x more alkaline or acidic than the previous level – that’s huge!

              This means ammonia-based hair color makes the hair 600x more alkaline than it’s original state. This blasting open of the cuticle makes re-closing the hair nearly impossible, resulting in a major loss of protein and moisture, as well as imminent color fading and damage.

              Depending on the brand, you can find any number of these ingredients used instead of ammonia.
              – Monoethanolamine (MEA)
              – Ethanolamine
              – Cocomide MEA
              – Aminomethylpropanol (AMEA)

              Here’s where the difference in ammonia free hair color lines gets serious!

              While MEA or Ethanolamine are odorless and not as corrosive as ammonia, the pH of the hair is STILL raised to an extraordinarily high level, if used in the same percentages as ammonia.

              The only thing most brands have achieved in removing ammonia is just that – the removal of ammonia – they’ve still neglected one of the most vital components of hair health – a balanced pH!

              So, what can professional ammonia free hair color brands do to ensure the pH of the hair is kept intact?

              The answer is simple – use heat to help open the cuticle.

              If a professional, ammonia-free color line doesn’t use heat to help open the cuticle, they’re using MEA or Ethanolamine in the same percentages as ammonia, and consequently, wreaking havoc on the structural integrity of the hair.

              Aim for color lines that minimize the use of Ethanolamine and MEA, not ones that just simply swap ammonia for an odor-free alternative.

              Most ammonia-free hair color lines use a synthetic source of Ethanolamine – produced by the reaction of ethylene oxide with ammonia.

              However, there’s a natural source of Ethanolamine derived from the fatty acids in coconut, called Cocomide MEA. The natural emollients present in this form of MEA makes this option much more desirable in hair color.

              The extraction method is more costly than cooking up some synthetic MEA in a lab.

              Alas, there’s another problem with using Ethanolamine and MEA in higher than necessary percentages… the removal process.

              It has been postulated that this ingredient is hard to remove from hair.

              Companies still standing by ammoniated hair color have used this aspect of MEA as a way to denounce its effectiveness, but have failed to realize one enormous detail.

              The best ammonia-free hair color lines have added Oleic acid (derived from olive oil) to safely remove any product left on the hair.

              However, some ammonia-free color lines haven’t caught on to this little trick – make sure to use brands that have!

              We’ve covered the primary role of ammonia, and it’s more desirable alternatives, but don’t forget – ammonia also has a secondary function.

              When mixed with peroxide, ammonia neutralizes the existing color pigment, allowing color to further penetrate the cuticle.

              Ethanolamine and MEA aren’t capable of doing this effectively.

              So, an ammonia-free hair color line must have a color delivery system that compensates for the lack of ammonia.

              Top-rated hair color lines have found an oil-based delivery system not only solves this problem, but that it actually works better than ammonia.

              Hair absorbs oil before water, so using oil as a means of color molecule transport is not only effective, but optimal in any color line.

              When deciding which ammonia-free color line is best for your salon and stylists, be sure to dig deeper into these type of ingredients!

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                According to the F.D.A., Brazilian Blowouts are extremely hazardous to your health!

                The Brazilian Blowout is very effective for smoothing hair, but it’s nowhere near worth the harmful health effects it has on stylists and clients, but don’t worry, at My Hair Trip Salon we have an organic healthy alternative that will give you the same silky smooth hair as a Brazilian blowout, without causing the severe harm associated with the traditional Brazilian blowout.

                FDA, OSHA Act on Brazilian Blowout

                FDA has received a number of inquiries from consumers and salon professionals concerning the safety of “Brazilian Blowout” and similar “professional use only” hair smoothing products. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Hazard Alert in April 2011 to hair salon owners and workers about potential formaldehyde exposure from working with these products. On August 22, 2011, FDA issued a Warning Letter citing Brazilian Blowout for safety and labeling violations. The following information is intended to answer questions people may have on this subject.
                FDA’s Role in Regulating These Products

                FDA regulates cosmetics, including hair smoothing products, under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and, if they are marketed on a retail basis to consumers, under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Under these laws, cosmetics do not have to be approved by FDA before going on the market. However, cosmetics must be safe and properly labeled, and companies and individuals who manufacture or market them have a legal responsibility for the safety and labeling of their products and ingredients. FDA can take action against cosmetics on the market that do not comply with the law. To learn more, see FDA Authority Over Cosmetics.

                What This Warning Letter Says About Brazilian Blowout

                FDA issues Warning Letters to notify firms or individuals that they have been found in violation of the laws FDA enforces. A Warning Letter also tells what violations need to be corrected in order to comply with the law.

                The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter cites both safety and labeling violations. For example, the letter lists health risks associated with inhaling formaldehyde and reactions that have been reported when people used the product as directed. Among the reported reactions were eye problems, nervous system problems such as headaches and dizziness, respiratory tract problems, nausea, chest pain, vomiting, and rash. The letter also states that the labeling was misleading because it called the product “formaldehyde free,” even though people were exposed to formaldehyde when using it as intended. The labeling also failed to reveal possible consequences of using this product under the conditions prescribed in the labels or labeling.

                Regulation of Salon Safety

                FDA does not have authority over the operation of salons or the practice of cosmetology.

                Workplace safety in general, including air quality issues, is regulated by OSHA. Salons are also generally subject to state and local authorities, which may specify safety practices such as assuring proper ventilation.

                What OSHA Says About These Products

                During investigations, OSHA found formaldehyde in the air when stylists used hair smoothing products, some of which did not have formaldehyde listed on their labels or in Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) as required by law. During one investigation, air tests showed formaldehyde at levels greater than OSHA’s limits, even though the product tested was labeled as formaldehyde-free. OSHA states that formaldehyde presents a health hazard if workers are exposed. It can irritate the eyes and nose; cause allergic reactions of the skin, eyes, and lungs; and is linked to nose and lung cancer.

                For OSHA’s complete statement, see Hazard Alert: Hair-Smoothing Products That Could Release Formaldehyde.

                Similar Products That Use Formaldehyde-related Ingredients

                The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter should not be interpreted as a broad evaluation of the safety of hair-smoothing products or such ingredients as formaldehyde, methylene glycol, or other formaldehyde-related ingredients. Other hair-smoothing products may vary with respect to composition, intended conditions of use, and other factors. FDA continues to evaluate these products for safety and labeling on a case-by-case basis.

                FDA’s Advice to Consumers

                Skin sensitivity can develop after repeated contact with formaldehyde-related ingredients. When formaldehyde is released into the air it can cause serious irritation of your eyes, nose and lungs. It is recommended that you limit your exposure to products that contain formaldehyde-related ingredients to reduce these health risks.

                Read the label. If you’re purchasing a product on a retail basis, whether at a store or by mail order, including on the Internet, the product is required to have a list of the ingredients. If it doesn’t, please let FDA know. The list of ingredients is required under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Here are some ingredients to look for:

                Formaldehyde
                Formalin
                Methylene glycol
                Ask your salon professional. Products that are marketed only to salon professionals may not have a list of ingredients, because the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act doesn’t apply to them. They are required, however, to have directions for safe use, and OSHA requires them to have an MSDS. You can ask salon professionals if they know whether a product contains formaldehyde-related ingredients or other ingredients you may wish to avoid. In its Hazard Alert on formaldehyde dangers to hair salon owners and workers, OSHA addressed the information companies should provide to salon workers in an MSDS. However, as OSHA also pointed out, the MSDS for Brazilian Blowout did not contain all the required information.
                Report bad reactions. Consumers are one of FDA’s most important sources of information, especially because the law doesn’t require cosmetics to be approved by FDA before they go on the market. To report a reaction to a cosmetic product, use one of these contacts:

                1) Reporting by phone to the Consumer Complaint Coordinator at your nearest FDA district office. Phone numbers are posted on FDA’s Web page, Consumer Complaint Coordinators, and in the Blue Pages of the phone book, generally under United States Government/Health and Human Services.

                2) Reporting online to FDA’s MedWatch adverse event reporting system. You also may call Medwatch at 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form by mail.

                Salon workers also can file complaints about unsafe workplaces with OSHA, as stated in OSHA’s Hazard Alert.

                Where to Learn More

                For information on workplace exposure to formaldehyde, see Formaldehyde on OSHA’s website. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has published resources on formaldehyde on its website under Formaldehyde: NIOSH Resources.

                FDA will continue to monitor safety issues regarding hair-smoothing products and will report on any new developments.

                October 8, 2010; updated October 18, 2010, May 24, 2011, and October 21, 2011

                Article found at FDA, OSHA Act on Brazilian Blowout

                FDA has received a number of inquiries from consumers and salon professionals concerning the safety of “Brazilian Blowout” and similar “professional use only” hair smoothing products. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Hazard Alert in April 2011 to hair salon owners and workers about potential formaldehyde exposure from working with these products. On August 22, 2011, FDA issued a Warning Letter citing Brazilian Blowout for safety and labeling violations. The following information is intended to answer questions people may have on this subject.
                FDA’s Role in Regulating These Products

                FDA regulates cosmetics, including hair smoothing products, under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and, if they are marketed on a retail basis to consumers, under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Under these laws, cosmetics do not have to be approved by FDA before going on the market. However, cosmetics must be safe and properly labeled, and companies and individuals who manufacture or market them have a legal responsibility for the safety and labeling of their products and ingredients. FDA can take action against cosmetics on the market that do not comply with the law. To learn more, see FDA Authority Over Cosmetics.

                What This Warning Letter Says About Brazilian Blowout

                FDA issues Warning Letters to notify firms or individuals that they have been found in violation of the laws FDA enforces. A Warning Letter also tells what violations need to be corrected in order to comply with the law.

                The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter cites both safety and labeling violations. For example, the letter lists health risks associated with inhaling formaldehyde and reactions that have been reported when people used the product as directed. Among the reported reactions were eye problems, nervous system problems such as headaches and dizziness, respiratory tract problems, nausea, chest pain, vomiting, and rash. The letter also states that the labeling was misleading because it called the product “formaldehyde free,” even though people were exposed to formaldehyde when using it as intended. The labeling also failed to reveal possible consequences of using this product under the conditions prescribed in the labels or labeling.

                Regulation of Salon Safety

                FDA does not have authority over the operation of salons or the practice of cosmetology.

                Workplace safety in general, including air quality issues, is regulated by OSHA. Salons are also generally subject to state and local authorities, which may specify safety practices such as assuring proper ventilation.

                What OSHA Says About These Products

                During investigations, OSHA found formaldehyde in the air when stylists used hair smoothing products, some of which did not have formaldehyde listed on their labels or in Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) as required by law. During one investigation, air tests showed formaldehyde at levels greater than OSHA’s limits, even though the product tested was labeled as formaldehyde-free. OSHA states that formaldehyde presents a health hazard if workers are exposed. It can irritate the eyes and nose; cause allergic reactions of the skin, eyes, and lungs; and is linked to nose and lung cancer.

                For OSHA’s complete statement, see Hazard Alert: Hair-Smoothing Products That Could Release Formaldehyde.

                Similar Products That Use Formaldehyde-related Ingredients

                The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter should not be interpreted as a broad evaluation of the safety of hair-smoothing products or such ingredients as formaldehyde, methylene glycol, or other formaldehyde-related ingredients. Other hair-smoothing products may vary with respect to composition, intended conditions of use, and other factors. FDA continues to evaluate these products for safety and labeling on a case-by-case basis.

                FDA’s Advice to Consumers

                Skin sensitivity can develop after repeated contact with formaldehyde-related ingredients. When formaldehyde is released into the air it can cause serious irritation of your eyes, nose and lungs. It is recommended that you limit your exposure to products that contain formaldehyde-related ingredients to reduce these health risks.

                Read the label. If you’re purchasing a product on a retail basis, whether at a store or by mail order, including on the Internet, the product is required to have a list of the ingredients. If it doesn’t, please let FDA know. The list of ingredients is required under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Here are some ingredients to look for:

                Formaldehyde
                Formalin
                Methylene glycol
                Ask your salon professional. Products that are marketed only to salon professionals may not have a list of ingredients, because the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act doesn’t apply to them. They are required, however, to have directions for safe use, and OSHA requires them to have an MSDS. You can ask salon professionals if they know whether a product contains formaldehyde-related ingredients or other ingredients you may wish to avoid. In its Hazard Alert on formaldehyde dangers to hair salon owners and workers, OSHA addressed the information companies should provide to salon workers in an MSDS. However, as OSHA also pointed out, the MSDS for Brazilian Blowout did not contain all the required information.
                Report bad reactions. Consumers are one of FDA’s most important sources of information, especially because the law doesn’t require cosmetics to be approved by FDA before they go on the market. To report a reaction to a cosmetic product, use one of these contacts:

                1) Reporting by phone to the Consumer Complaint Coordinator at your nearest FDA district office. Phone numbers are posted on FDA’s Web page, Consumer Complaint Coordinators, and in the Blue Pages of the phone book, generally under United States Government/Health and Human Services.

                2) Reporting online to FDA’s MedWatch adverse event reporting system. You also may call Medwatch at 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form by mail.

                Salon workers also can file complaints about unsafe workplaces with OSHA, as stated in OSHA’s Hazard Alert.

                Where to Learn More

                For information on workplace exposure to formaldehyde, see Formaldehyde on OSHA’s website. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has published resources on formaldehyde on its website under Formaldehyde: NIOSH Resources.

                FDA will continue to monitor safety issues regarding hair-smoothing products and will report on any new developments.

                article found at http://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/productsingredients/products/ucm228898.htm

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                  NCIS Star Pauley Perrette Issues Hair Dye Health Warning After Severe Allergic Reaction

                  LOS ANGELES (CBSLA.com) – NCIS actress Pauley Perrette is warning fans about the dangers of hair dye after suffering a severe allergic reaction to her trademark ink-black color.
                  CBSLA’s Kristine Lazar spoke with Perrette, whose character, Abby Sciuto, is known for her raven locks.

                  A natural blonde, the actress has been dying her hair for 20 years.
                  But her beauty routine landed her in the hospital when she broke out in a rash and began to experience severe swelling.

                  “The other half of my face had become twice the size of my head,” she said.
                  Perrette posted a photo of her swollen face on social media, warning her half-million Twitter followers about the dangers of hair-dye allergies.

                  This was me at hospital today and it got worse #Allergy #AllergicReaction PLEASE read my next tweet http://t.co/AYf4GfM3sm
                  — Pauley Perrette (@PauleyP) July 19, 2014

                  “The most important thing to me is that anyone out there that dyes their hair, particularly black, you need to be aware of the symptoms,” she said.
                  There are warning signs, according to Jacob Offenberger, an allergist at Northridge Medical Center.

                  “If you have hair dye, and the next day or the day after you start to have itchiness and you start to see redness or [an] eczema-type of lesion, it is telling that you that you are having an allergic reaction to that dying,” Offenberger said, warning, “If you would do nothing, the next time you do the hair dye, it’s going to get worse.”

                  That is exactly what happened to Perrette.
                  Six months ago, the actress broke out into a rash all over her neck and scalp but ignored the symptoms, she said.
                  Perrette says she’s now looking into natural hair dye and also into wearing a wig.

                  Article found at http://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2014/07/22/ncis-star-pauley-perrette-issues-hair-dye-health-warning-after-severe-allergic-reaction/

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                    5 Organic DIY Body Scrubs With Major Benefits

                    The reasons to DIY your own skincare supplies go way beyond cheap and easy (though we’ve preached that message to you again and again!). When you use exfoliating body scrub, you’re not just giving your skin a pleasant-smelling, silky smooth makeover — you’re also lathering on vitamins and minerals that benefit your body in major ways. That grapefruit in your scented scrub? It helps eliminate wrinkles. Or the coffee grounds in your latte lather? It actually minimizes cellulite for a precious few hours.

                    So yeah, you could say this mind-blowing info gave us the incentive to create five power scrubs that go far beyond exfoliating. Start by gathering a slew of fridge and pantry-friendly organic ingredients — yes, organic DOES make a difference — and we’ll show you how to mix and mash them into serious skincare saviors.

                    BANANA BROWN SUGAR SCRUB
                    This moisturizing, oil-free scrub gives your skin a youthful glow. Plus, it’s packed with vitamins and minerals to help keep your skin tight.

                    Ingredients:
                    – 1 cup brown sugar
                    – 3 brown bananas
                    Add brown sugar and brown banana chunks (they break down much easier than yellow bananas) to a bowl and mush with a spatula. To get the consistency just right, use your fingers to crush the banana bits. Bonus! You can totally lick your fingers clean! No joke — we kept saying what a dope pancake topping this scrub would make. Organic ingredients FTW!

                    GRAPEFRUIT-AVOCADO OIL SUGAR SCRUB
                    Grapefruit brings its free-radical fighting powers to this scrub that helps equalize your skin tone and bust everything from blemishes to wrinkles. Best news: Mild avocado oil won’t block your pores.

                    Ingredients:
                    – 1 cup sugar
                    – 1/2 grapefruit, squeezed
                    – 3 tablespoons avocado oil
                    Juice half a grapefruit into a bowl of sugar and pour in your avocado oil (AVOO if you think like Rachael Ray), then stir to combine. Remember: The more you stir, the more the sugar will dissolve, so use more of a folding motion if you want to keep the granules in tact!

                    LAVENDER-GRAPESEED OIL SEA SALT SCRUB
                    Dried lavender exfoliates as it soothes the senses in this acne-fighting scrub. Sub sea salt for sugar to scrub away dead skin and other impurities. Lavender and sea salt are also perfect PICs for those battling eczema.

                    Ingredients:
                    – 1 cup sea salt
                    – 2-3 sprigs dried lavender
                    – 2-6 drops lavender essential oil
                    – 1 cup grape seed oil
                    Remove the lavender buds from the sprigs just like you would with herbs like thyme and rosemary, then boost the calming aroma by adding drops of lavender essential oil to your sea salt scrub. Pour in the grapeseed oil and gently mix to combine.

                    COFFEE-COCONUT OIL SUGAR SCRUB
                    Coffee is the wonder ingredient in this antioxidant packed-scrub: it not only reinvigorates your senses, but it also lightens and brightens the skin AND temporarily minimizes cellulite. Can we get an Amen!? We paired it with creamy coconut oil — one of the most moisturizing natural ingredients around.

                    Ingredients:
                    – 1/2 cup sugar
                    – 1/2 cup ground coffee
                    – 1 cup coconut oil
                    Coffee and sugar join forces outside the mug to make this scrub that’s bound together by coconut oil. Don’t even reach for the spatula with this mixture: the warmth from your hands will melt the coconut oil like a dream. Plus, it’s an excuse to get down and dirty 😉

                    PUMPKIN-HONEY BAKING SODA SCRUB
                    This super gentle scrub has hella restorative powers from vitamin-packed pumpkin, which can help reverse skin damage. Soothing honey gives your skin a natural glow and helps to unclog pores.

                    Ingredients:
                    – 1 can pumpkin
                    – 1 cup baking soda
                    – 1/4 cup honey
                    So baking soda kinda came out of left field, right? It’s an extremely gentle exfoliant, so this scrub is great for those with super sensitive skin. Mix it together with pumpkin pulp and honey and you’re done. (PS: As tempting as this pumpkin scrub may look, don’t try to taste it—baking soda is NOT a palette pleaser!).

                    Unless you and your gal pals are planning to use these scrubs straight from the mixing bowl at a stay-at-home spa day (um, that sounds nice!), you’ll want to transfer your scrubs into containers so that they’ll keep longer (about a week in the fridge). We used glass jars so we could see exactly what scrub is inside—A+ for easy access.

                    How gorgeous did these scrubs turn out? They definitely indicate how good your skin will look and feel once you lather them on!

                    We couldn’t resist compiling all of this eye candy — these scrubs are stunning from every angle 🙂 And since they’re all so easy to make, you don’t even have to pick and choose from the group, lucky you! For reals, why buy expensive skincare products when you can DIY just like that?

                    We found this awesome article at http://www.brit.co/organic-body-scrubs/?utm_campaign=pinbutton_hover

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