x
Beauty from the Inside Out

You are what you eat, right? Well, that goes double for your skin, hair, and nails. Stay glowing and gorgeous by putting more of these foods on your plate

While a fresh blowout and a hint of blush can help you look your best, some of the most potent beauty weapons are found in the supermarket. Your food picks have an enormous effect on your appearance, says nutritionist Keri Glassman, R.D., author of The O2 Diet: The Cutting Edge Antioxidant-Based Program That Will Make You Healthy, Thin, and Beautiful. And you’ll see results fast. “In just 28 days—the lifecycle of your skin—a nutritious diet can impart a glow that no cream can accomplish alone,” says Ellen Marmur, M.D., a dermatologist in New York City and author of Simple Skin Beauty. Boost your good looks by adding more of these items to your cart.

Blueberries and Pomegranates
Both of these fruits are bursting with antioxidants called anthocyanins, which help protect you from fine lines and dryness by neutralizing the free radicals that weather your skin. Plus, their high vitamin C content enhances the production of collagen, which keeps your skin nice and plump, says Glassman. (And weighing in at less than 100 calories a cup, they have the opposite effect on your waistline.)

Dark Chocolate
Teenage breakouts used to be blamed, at least in part, on wolfing down too many candy bars. But according to Marmur, chocolate has never been proven to cause blemishes. In fact, the sweet stuff contains high levels of flavonoids, potent antioxidants that can help protect your skin from sun damage and amp up blood flow to your tissues, keeping skin nourished and glowing, says Glassman. Look for chocolate that’s at least 70 percent cacao (it has more antioxidants), and use restraint. If you’ve been known to take down a giant chocolate bar in one sitting, buy individually wrapped nuggets instead and stick to one or two (about one ounce) a day.

Spinach
Spinach is another powerhouse of vital nutrients and antioxidants that help fight inflammation and free-radical damage—precursors to fine lines and wrinkles. It’s also loaded with a kind of antioxidant called lutein, which helps eyes stay healthy and bright. Most important, spinach is an all-star source of vitamin A (beta-carotene), which helps speed up skin cell turnover and keeps skin supple, says Marmur. (And from this beta-carotene, your body generates its very own retinol, which makes skin firm and resilient.) All this and it’s nearly calorie-free: One cup of raw spinach has just seven calories and 55 percent of your RDA of vitamin A (700 IU). For variety, swap spinach for kale, collard greens, and Swiss chard—all of which have similar look-pretty powers.

Walnuts
You don’t have to gnaw more nuts than a squirrel to enjoy their many perks—smoother skin, healthier hair, brighter eyes, and stronger bones. Eating just one ounce of walnuts (about 14 halves) by themselves or in your salad, pasta, or dessert will supply you with your daily dose of the nutrients (namely omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E) that are responsible for these radiant results. Other top nuts include hazelnuts, pistachios, and almonds.

Yogurt
Eating one cup of plain low-fat yogurt knocks off nearly half of your RDA of calcium with about 450 milligrams of the nutrient—and calcium is key for strong nails and teeth. Plus, eight ounces is packed with two grams of zinc (25 percent of the RDA), which helps calm skin inflammation, treat rosacea, and prompt regeneration of cells, notes Marmur.

Tomatoes
A new adage should be, “A tomato a day keeps the dermatologist away.” Whether this red fruit is sliced, diced, stewed, or simmered, it helps protect skin against damage from the sun and other environmental factors thanks to its key ingredient, the antioxidant lycopene. Lycopene is actually highest in cooked tomatoes—yet another reason to opt for a red sauce over a cream-based one.

Healthy fats aid the body’s absorption of lycopene and other nutrients, so eat one serving of tomatoes a day with a drizzle of olive oil, a splash of vinaigrette, or a slice of avocado, says Glassman.

Kiwis
Inside that plain brown wrapper is a green gift of vitamin C, which can help stimulate collagen synthesis, repair damage to skin-cell DNA, and keep blood vessels and hair follicles strong, says Marmur. A single kiwi has nearly all the vitamin C you need in a day but only 42 calories. Add some slices to your breakfast, toss pieces into a smoothie, or dice it and serve atop fro-yo.

Edamame
If you’re seeking smoother skin, jump for soy! Research shows that the isoflavones in soy foods—including tofu, soy milk, and edamame—can ease inflammation and stave off collagen breakdown, leaving skin with a more even tone and fewer wrinkles. There’s no RDA for soy, notes Glassman, but a serving per day is both safe and helpful. Add soy milk to your morning cup of coffee and toss half a cup of boiled edamame into a salad or pasta dish.

Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, and Butternut Squash
These orange wonder veggies contain a bonanza of beauty-boosting beta-carotene, which your body converts into skin-smoothing retinol, thereby helping to protect your skin from past and present sun damage, says Glassman.

Green Tea
Warm up to this soothing brew’s antioxidants, called catechins, which can help prevent certain skin cancers and stave off sunburns, says Marmur. The variety of tea with the highest concentration of catechins is called matcha.

For all the pretty perks, drink two cups a day. If you aren’t into tea, try sprinkling green matcha powder (available at health-food stores) into a yogurt parfait or homemade smoothie. And if you’re trying to cut down on caffeine, worry not. With just 26 milligrams of caffeine per six-ounce cup, green tea has about half as much as a cup of black tea.

This article and more found at http://www.womenshealthmag.com/beauty/beauty-foods

Leave a reply
    x
    Essential Oils for Hair Promote Healthy Hair and Scalp

    Essential oils for hair can help promote healthy hair and scalp, reduce dryness and hair loss associated with the natural aging process.

    Do you want great, healthy looking hair? Every time I walk into get my hair cut, my stylist always says she can’t believe how fast my hair grows and how shiny it is!

    But, first, did you know that…

    How our hair looks, feels and grows can change based on –

    What we put on it (synthetic shampoos, conditioners, gel, etc)

    What we eat and drink (good for body=good for hair)

    What we do (swimming in chlorinated pools, using hair dryer, etc)

    Quality of our shower water (Use a shower filter for best results to remove fluoride, chlorine, iron oxides (“rust water”), reduce harmful VOCs and other contaminants.)

    Genetics (what are parents passed down to us)

    How much sleep we have nightly

    Our stress level and

    Possibly even healthy thyroid function
    So, my advice is, in addition to using the oils, review that list and determine if there is something else you need to do to support having healthy hair and scalp. This may be as simple as drinking more water!

    Also,

    Did you know that most shampoos, hair and skincare products on the market contain synthetic materials that create many of our hair, scalp and skin challenges?

    Here are a few examples –

    Propylene Glycol – may causes dry skin and skin irritation.

    Sodium Lauryl Sulfate or Laureth Sulfate – surfactant that may corrode hair follicles

    Oleyl betaine – may cause dry hair and scalp.

    Mineral oils – petroleum products clog pores! Yes, the molecule is too big to be absorbed by the skin.
    So, check your labels, you may be surprised! If your shampoo has a pH between 4 and 6 and doesn’t have synthetic compounds it’s supportive to healthy hair growth.

    There are great natural hair products on the market that contain essential oils including the AromaSilk line by Young Living. This are the only products I will place on my head!

    If you are adventurous, make them at home by using a base shampoo and adding oils that are right for your hair type or condition. I usually add 3 to 5 drops of each oil to the shampoo directly or in a tablespoon of shampoo.

    But, what is my hair type and what oils do I use?

    No problem, below you will find the information on all the hair types and the corresponding oils. Also, provided is the carrier or base oils that are best for your hair type. Or Check out the Essential Oils fo Hair Chart.

    Oils for Normal Hair

    Normal hair is neither greasy nor dry, has not been permed or colored, holds its style and is usually shiny.

    These oils are best for normal hair:

    Lavender Essential Oil

    Rosemary Essential Oil

    Lemon Essential Oil

    Geranium Essential Oil

    Cedarwood Essential Oil

    Thyme Essential Oil

    Clary Sage Essential Oil
    The best base or carrier oils to use are jojoba, almond or borage.

    Oils for Dry Hair

    Dry hair looks dull, tangles easily and can become easily split at the ends. Therefore, we want essential oils for hair that stimulate the sebaceous glands in the scalp to produce more oil!

    Use these oils:

    Lavender Essential Oil

    Rosemary Essential Oil

    Sandalwood Essential Oil

    Geranium Essential Oil
    The top base or carrier oils to use are almond, sesame, jojoba, borage, cocoa butter or avocado.

    Oils for Oily Hair

    Oily hair looks greasy and is caused by over production of sebum by the sebaceous glands. Therefore, we want essential oils for hair that restore the glands back to normal.

    Use these oils:

    Lavender Essential Oil

    Rosemary Essential Oil

    Lemon Essential Oil

    Peppermint Essential Oil

    Cypress Essential Oil
    The top base or carrier oils are sesame, jojoba and borage.

    Other Hair Challenges? Need to Cleanse the Hair?

    No problem, here are my recommendations.

    Use a cleansing shampoo or cleansing oils first before you start. This will remove the buildup of chlorine, grease and chemicals in your hair and scalp.

    Pick several essential oils for hair to use for shampooing and/or make a blend with the base oil. (You may have to experiment with several oils until you find what you like)

    Use until you feel there is improvement.

    Start to include or use oils that support healthy hair growth next.

    article found @ http://www.experience-essential-oils.com/essential-oils-for-hair.html

    Leave a reply
      x
      Hair Salon Dream Team

      My Hair Trip Salon Denver consists of it’s owners; Paul and Nicole Zamora. The Shop Manager; Thomas Ivory jr. Master Stylists / Colorists; Sonia Jean Sparks and Amber Vitale, and of course, one of Denver’s hottest up and coming talents, stylist/colorist; The, Ms. Erica Nelson.

      Nicole began working in the beauty industry in Wisconsin twelve years ago working in hair salons and spas, and has worked at a hair salon in Denver for the last 4 and a half years. Specializing in hair behind the chair, Nicole has a passion for finding healthy alternatives for almost anything and now feels ,through My Hair Trip salon Denver, there is a platform for which she may encourage others to do the same. Nic always strives for her clients to leave the salon feeling gorgeous and enlightened.”

      Paul has always been an entrepreneur, even since he was running his school store in junior high. Paul has owned, and operated several small businesses, including a small production company while bartending in downtown Denver. The bar that Paul worked at had been open about 3 years when Paul took over as the bar manager. The business was failing and the owners thought Paul could possibly turn it around. Over the next several years Paul devoted all of his time and energy into making the bar profitable. Today it is one of downtown Denver’s most popular and profitable bars.

      Thomas is a long-time close friend of the Zamora Family and has helped run the shop since day one. Thomas is the salon manager, he also is a professional model, writer, traveler, gardner, artist, musician, avid outdoorsman and our dear friend.
      Thomas is our captain of client retention. While at My Hair Trip Salon, Thomas is your personal concierge, taking care of all of your needs while you are a guest at Denver’s premier eco-salon. Thomas is a professional pamperer and runs the salon’s day-to-day like nobody’s business.

      Sonia Sparks is a master stylist and colorist in Denver, CO, 80204 via Roseville Michigan. Sonia and Nicole had chanced to meet as booth renters at a smaller non-organic Salon in downtown Denver. Once My Hair Trip was up and running Paul and Nicole were thrilled when Sonia asked if she could come on board. She is honestly one of the best stylists in the city and My Hair Trip Salon Denver is extremely lucky to have her. Sonia brings not only amazing skills as a professional hair stylist and colorist but she brings an overall positivity and energy that radiates through the salon as well.
      Experience: Sonia has 12 years experience as a master stylist and colorist.
      Sonia graduated cosmetology school from David Presley School of Cosmotology in 2004.
      Sonia is a dedicated session stylist who specializes in updos for special events such as weddings and fashion shows.
      Sonia has worked personally assisting Kevin Murphey.
      Sonia is a professional, certified organic colorist, session stylist, and master cosmetologist. Any cut , any color , any time.

      Amber Vitale has lived in Denver her entire life, and is constantly influenced by the culture and artistic creativity within our city! Growing up she was encouraged to embrace an artistic outlet of interest and to make life decisions grounded on wisdom and great thought. Amber specializes in custom hair color and precision cutting. Combined with her talent and artistic vision she is able to work with clients to individualize styles to meet their needs. She keeps up with the latest techniques and hair trends as they appear on the fashion scene. Amber believes strongly in continuing education with the most recent being a certified extensionist through She by So Cap USA. She is constantly working on her own innovative techniques always pushing the boundaries of hair. With over 15 years’ experience, Amber is a stylist that believes in being unlimited in all aspects of hair care and design that complement each other for the finished look. Whether you want a contemporary classic cut or a funky avant-garde style, you are sure to be pleased with the experience you have with Amber.
      Being a mother of two wonderful boys, it is as important as ever for me to continue this lifestyle I love the approach at My Hair Trip Salon in incorporating an organic and eco -friendly way of life into great hair care and design.

      Erica says “My little sister was my first and my longest standing client. She has tested my skills again and again and I now feel comfortable to try them on you! 🙂 I have gained knowledge of top color lines and am able to play with and bend the laws of color to create unique and lasting designs for my clients. I have also become an expert at prescribing top of the line retail products so that my designs will look as great at home as they do in my chair.
      I would consider women’s cutting and men’s grooming to be my specialty and first love. I feel passionately about my color designs and sending beautiful works of art out onto the streets of Denver.
      I am committed to the beauty and fashion industry and love to share all aspects of this business with the guests in my chair. I love yoga, running, snowboarding, cooking, all things French and the outdoors. I am an outgoing, friendly, caring, hardworker and fast learner with lots of energy and I am so happy to have found a salon with a great vibe and a fast pace to call home.”

      We have built the best salon team in Denver, Colorado. We cannot express how proud we are to work side by side every week with these incredible artists and create amazing hair and happy, enthusiastic clients. As we grow, we will add more members to our team, but we will always stay true to our core values in hiring. Top talent, eco-conscious, dedicated and charismatic.

      We are Denver’s premier eco friendly salon, located at 773 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, CO, 80204.

      Leave a reply
        x
        Not all Ammonia-Free Color is Created Equal

        Before we jump to any conclusions, one should know the differences among the salon industry’s top professional color lines – not all ammonia-free hair color is created equal.

        First, let’s quickly remind ourselves the part ammonia plays in hair color:

        Ammonia’s primary function is to raise the pH of the hair, open the cuticle, and allow for color to enter the cortex. The more ammonia in a color product, the higher the pH of the hair will become and the wider the cuticle will open.

        The average working pH of hair processed with ammoniated hair color is 10-11, while the natural isometric pH of hair is 4.5-5.5!

        NOTE: The pH scale is logarithmic, meaning with each rise in pH level, the new level is 10x more alkaline or acidic than the previous level – that’s huge!

        This means ammonia-based hair color makes the hair 600x more alkaline than it’s original state. This blasting open of the cuticle makes re-closing the hair nearly impossible, resulting in a major loss of protein and moisture, as well as imminent color fading and damage.

        Depending on the brand, you can find any number of these ingredients used instead of ammonia.
        – Monoethanolamine (MEA)
        – Ethanolamine
        – Cocomide MEA
        – Aminomethylpropanol (AMEA)

        Here’s where the difference in ammonia free hair color lines gets serious!

        While MEA or Ethanolamine are odorless and not as corrosive as ammonia, the pH of the hair is STILL raised to an extraordinarily high level, if used in the same percentages as ammonia.

        The only thing most brands have achieved in removing ammonia is just that – the removal of ammonia – they’ve still neglected one of the most vital components of hair health – a balanced pH!

        So, what can professional ammonia free hair color brands do to ensure the pH of the hair is kept intact?

        The answer is simple – use heat to help open the cuticle.

        If a professional, ammonia-free color line doesn’t use heat to help open the cuticle, they’re using MEA or Ethanolamine in the same percentages as ammonia, and consequently, wreaking havoc on the structural integrity of the hair.

        Aim for color lines that minimize the use of Ethanolamine and MEA, not ones that just simply swap ammonia for an odor-free alternative.

        Most ammonia-free hair color lines use a synthetic source of Ethanolamine – produced by the reaction of ethylene oxide with ammonia.

        However, there’s a natural source of Ethanolamine derived from the fatty acids in coconut, called Cocomide MEA. The natural emollients present in this form of MEA makes this option much more desirable in hair color.

        The extraction method is more costly than cooking up some synthetic MEA in a lab.

        Alas, there’s another problem with using Ethanolamine and MEA in higher than necessary percentages… the removal process.

        It has been postulated that this ingredient is hard to remove from hair.

        Companies still standing by ammoniated hair color have used this aspect of MEA as a way to denounce its effectiveness, but have failed to realize one enormous detail.

        The best ammonia-free hair color lines have added Oleic acid (derived from olive oil) to safely remove any product left on the hair.

        However, some ammonia-free color lines haven’t caught on to this little trick – make sure to use brands that have!

        We’ve covered the primary role of ammonia, and it’s more desirable alternatives, but don’t forget – ammonia also has a secondary function.

        When mixed with peroxide, ammonia neutralizes the existing color pigment, allowing color to further penetrate the cuticle.

        Ethanolamine and MEA aren’t capable of doing this effectively.

        So, an ammonia-free hair color line must have a color delivery system that compensates for the lack of ammonia.

        Top-rated hair color lines have found an oil-based delivery system not only solves this problem, but that it actually works better than ammonia.

        Hair absorbs oil before water, so using oil as a means of color molecule transport is not only effective, but optimal in any color line.

        When deciding which ammonia-free color line is best for your salon and stylists, be sure to dig deeper into these type of ingredients!

        Leave a reply
          x
          According to the F.D.A., Brazilian Blowouts are extremely hazardous to your health!

          The Brazilian Blowout is very effective for smoothing hair, but it’s nowhere near worth the harmful health effects it has on stylists and clients, but don’t worry, at My Hair Trip Salon we have an organic healthy alternative that will give you the same silky smooth hair as a Brazilian blowout, without causing the severe harm associated with the traditional Brazilian blowout.

          FDA, OSHA Act on Brazilian Blowout

          FDA has received a number of inquiries from consumers and salon professionals concerning the safety of “Brazilian Blowout” and similar “professional use only” hair smoothing products. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Hazard Alert in April 2011 to hair salon owners and workers about potential formaldehyde exposure from working with these products. On August 22, 2011, FDA issued a Warning Letter citing Brazilian Blowout for safety and labeling violations. The following information is intended to answer questions people may have on this subject.
          FDA’s Role in Regulating These Products

          FDA regulates cosmetics, including hair smoothing products, under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and, if they are marketed on a retail basis to consumers, under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Under these laws, cosmetics do not have to be approved by FDA before going on the market. However, cosmetics must be safe and properly labeled, and companies and individuals who manufacture or market them have a legal responsibility for the safety and labeling of their products and ingredients. FDA can take action against cosmetics on the market that do not comply with the law. To learn more, see FDA Authority Over Cosmetics.

          What This Warning Letter Says About Brazilian Blowout

          FDA issues Warning Letters to notify firms or individuals that they have been found in violation of the laws FDA enforces. A Warning Letter also tells what violations need to be corrected in order to comply with the law.

          The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter cites both safety and labeling violations. For example, the letter lists health risks associated with inhaling formaldehyde and reactions that have been reported when people used the product as directed. Among the reported reactions were eye problems, nervous system problems such as headaches and dizziness, respiratory tract problems, nausea, chest pain, vomiting, and rash. The letter also states that the labeling was misleading because it called the product “formaldehyde free,” even though people were exposed to formaldehyde when using it as intended. The labeling also failed to reveal possible consequences of using this product under the conditions prescribed in the labels or labeling.

          Regulation of Salon Safety

          FDA does not have authority over the operation of salons or the practice of cosmetology.

          Workplace safety in general, including air quality issues, is regulated by OSHA. Salons are also generally subject to state and local authorities, which may specify safety practices such as assuring proper ventilation.

          What OSHA Says About These Products

          During investigations, OSHA found formaldehyde in the air when stylists used hair smoothing products, some of which did not have formaldehyde listed on their labels or in Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) as required by law. During one investigation, air tests showed formaldehyde at levels greater than OSHA’s limits, even though the product tested was labeled as formaldehyde-free. OSHA states that formaldehyde presents a health hazard if workers are exposed. It can irritate the eyes and nose; cause allergic reactions of the skin, eyes, and lungs; and is linked to nose and lung cancer.

          For OSHA’s complete statement, see Hazard Alert: Hair-Smoothing Products That Could Release Formaldehyde.

          Similar Products That Use Formaldehyde-related Ingredients

          The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter should not be interpreted as a broad evaluation of the safety of hair-smoothing products or such ingredients as formaldehyde, methylene glycol, or other formaldehyde-related ingredients. Other hair-smoothing products may vary with respect to composition, intended conditions of use, and other factors. FDA continues to evaluate these products for safety and labeling on a case-by-case basis.

          FDA’s Advice to Consumers

          Skin sensitivity can develop after repeated contact with formaldehyde-related ingredients. When formaldehyde is released into the air it can cause serious irritation of your eyes, nose and lungs. It is recommended that you limit your exposure to products that contain formaldehyde-related ingredients to reduce these health risks.

          Read the label. If you’re purchasing a product on a retail basis, whether at a store or by mail order, including on the Internet, the product is required to have a list of the ingredients. If it doesn’t, please let FDA know. The list of ingredients is required under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Here are some ingredients to look for:

          Formaldehyde
          Formalin
          Methylene glycol
          Ask your salon professional. Products that are marketed only to salon professionals may not have a list of ingredients, because the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act doesn’t apply to them. They are required, however, to have directions for safe use, and OSHA requires them to have an MSDS. You can ask salon professionals if they know whether a product contains formaldehyde-related ingredients or other ingredients you may wish to avoid. In its Hazard Alert on formaldehyde dangers to hair salon owners and workers, OSHA addressed the information companies should provide to salon workers in an MSDS. However, as OSHA also pointed out, the MSDS for Brazilian Blowout did not contain all the required information.
          Report bad reactions. Consumers are one of FDA’s most important sources of information, especially because the law doesn’t require cosmetics to be approved by FDA before they go on the market. To report a reaction to a cosmetic product, use one of these contacts:

          1) Reporting by phone to the Consumer Complaint Coordinator at your nearest FDA district office. Phone numbers are posted on FDA’s Web page, Consumer Complaint Coordinators, and in the Blue Pages of the phone book, generally under United States Government/Health and Human Services.

          2) Reporting online to FDA’s MedWatch adverse event reporting system. You also may call Medwatch at 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form by mail.

          Salon workers also can file complaints about unsafe workplaces with OSHA, as stated in OSHA’s Hazard Alert.

          Where to Learn More

          For information on workplace exposure to formaldehyde, see Formaldehyde on OSHA’s website. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has published resources on formaldehyde on its website under Formaldehyde: NIOSH Resources.

          FDA will continue to monitor safety issues regarding hair-smoothing products and will report on any new developments.

          October 8, 2010; updated October 18, 2010, May 24, 2011, and October 21, 2011

          Article found at FDA, OSHA Act on Brazilian Blowout

          FDA has received a number of inquiries from consumers and salon professionals concerning the safety of “Brazilian Blowout” and similar “professional use only” hair smoothing products. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Hazard Alert in April 2011 to hair salon owners and workers about potential formaldehyde exposure from working with these products. On August 22, 2011, FDA issued a Warning Letter citing Brazilian Blowout for safety and labeling violations. The following information is intended to answer questions people may have on this subject.
          FDA’s Role in Regulating These Products

          FDA regulates cosmetics, including hair smoothing products, under the authority of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act and, if they are marketed on a retail basis to consumers, under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Under these laws, cosmetics do not have to be approved by FDA before going on the market. However, cosmetics must be safe and properly labeled, and companies and individuals who manufacture or market them have a legal responsibility for the safety and labeling of their products and ingredients. FDA can take action against cosmetics on the market that do not comply with the law. To learn more, see FDA Authority Over Cosmetics.

          What This Warning Letter Says About Brazilian Blowout

          FDA issues Warning Letters to notify firms or individuals that they have been found in violation of the laws FDA enforces. A Warning Letter also tells what violations need to be corrected in order to comply with the law.

          The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter cites both safety and labeling violations. For example, the letter lists health risks associated with inhaling formaldehyde and reactions that have been reported when people used the product as directed. Among the reported reactions were eye problems, nervous system problems such as headaches and dizziness, respiratory tract problems, nausea, chest pain, vomiting, and rash. The letter also states that the labeling was misleading because it called the product “formaldehyde free,” even though people were exposed to formaldehyde when using it as intended. The labeling also failed to reveal possible consequences of using this product under the conditions prescribed in the labels or labeling.

          Regulation of Salon Safety

          FDA does not have authority over the operation of salons or the practice of cosmetology.

          Workplace safety in general, including air quality issues, is regulated by OSHA. Salons are also generally subject to state and local authorities, which may specify safety practices such as assuring proper ventilation.

          What OSHA Says About These Products

          During investigations, OSHA found formaldehyde in the air when stylists used hair smoothing products, some of which did not have formaldehyde listed on their labels or in Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) as required by law. During one investigation, air tests showed formaldehyde at levels greater than OSHA’s limits, even though the product tested was labeled as formaldehyde-free. OSHA states that formaldehyde presents a health hazard if workers are exposed. It can irritate the eyes and nose; cause allergic reactions of the skin, eyes, and lungs; and is linked to nose and lung cancer.

          For OSHA’s complete statement, see Hazard Alert: Hair-Smoothing Products That Could Release Formaldehyde.

          Similar Products That Use Formaldehyde-related Ingredients

          The Brazilian Blowout Warning Letter should not be interpreted as a broad evaluation of the safety of hair-smoothing products or such ingredients as formaldehyde, methylene glycol, or other formaldehyde-related ingredients. Other hair-smoothing products may vary with respect to composition, intended conditions of use, and other factors. FDA continues to evaluate these products for safety and labeling on a case-by-case basis.

          FDA’s Advice to Consumers

          Skin sensitivity can develop after repeated contact with formaldehyde-related ingredients. When formaldehyde is released into the air it can cause serious irritation of your eyes, nose and lungs. It is recommended that you limit your exposure to products that contain formaldehyde-related ingredients to reduce these health risks.

          Read the label. If you’re purchasing a product on a retail basis, whether at a store or by mail order, including on the Internet, the product is required to have a list of the ingredients. If it doesn’t, please let FDA know. The list of ingredients is required under the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act. Here are some ingredients to look for:

          Formaldehyde
          Formalin
          Methylene glycol
          Ask your salon professional. Products that are marketed only to salon professionals may not have a list of ingredients, because the Fair Packaging and Labeling Act doesn’t apply to them. They are required, however, to have directions for safe use, and OSHA requires them to have an MSDS. You can ask salon professionals if they know whether a product contains formaldehyde-related ingredients or other ingredients you may wish to avoid. In its Hazard Alert on formaldehyde dangers to hair salon owners and workers, OSHA addressed the information companies should provide to salon workers in an MSDS. However, as OSHA also pointed out, the MSDS for Brazilian Blowout did not contain all the required information.
          Report bad reactions. Consumers are one of FDA’s most important sources of information, especially because the law doesn’t require cosmetics to be approved by FDA before they go on the market. To report a reaction to a cosmetic product, use one of these contacts:

          1) Reporting by phone to the Consumer Complaint Coordinator at your nearest FDA district office. Phone numbers are posted on FDA’s Web page, Consumer Complaint Coordinators, and in the Blue Pages of the phone book, generally under United States Government/Health and Human Services.

          2) Reporting online to FDA’s MedWatch adverse event reporting system. You also may call Medwatch at 1-800-332-1088 to request a reporting form by mail.

          Salon workers also can file complaints about unsafe workplaces with OSHA, as stated in OSHA’s Hazard Alert.

          Where to Learn More

          For information on workplace exposure to formaldehyde, see Formaldehyde on OSHA’s website. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also has published resources on formaldehyde on its website under Formaldehyde: NIOSH Resources.

          FDA will continue to monitor safety issues regarding hair-smoothing products and will report on any new developments.

          article found at http://www.fda.gov/cosmetics/productsingredients/products/ucm228898.htm

          Leave a reply
            x
            My Hair Trip Salon is Officially a Certified Green Business

            GREEN MISSION
            Certifiably Green Salon

            My Hair Trip Salon Denver is Colorado’s only “Green” salon, barbershop, art gallery and jewelry and apparel boutique.

            We have wanted to work in phases from our first day of building, throughout the buildout process, into opening, into our everyday practices as a business and a team, towards the goal of being a certified, green business.

            When My Hair Trip Salon Denver teamed up with the City of Denver and the Department of Environmental Health this year, the vision of how to actually become a sustainable, green business started to become a reality.

            Working with a Sustainability Advisor in the Certifiably Green Denver program, we were able to analyze, and update, sustainable practices in energy, waste, water, and transportation.

            We did it! Today our dream of being a certified green business is a reality! We are officially recognized as certified green salon, and we are proud to be.

            My Hair Trip Salon Denver is Colorado’s only organic hair salon, barbershop, art gallery, and jewelry and apparel boutique. Located in the heart of the Denver Art District on Santa Fe, This Denver salon is at 773 Santa Fe Drive, Denver, CO, 80204. The salon’s focus in on customer service and customer satisfaction, specializing in chemical free products and services.

            Leave a reply