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10 Beauty Foods For Glowing Skin And Shiny Hair

“Beauty from the inside out is what we’re going for with a healthy lifestyle.

Rather than looking to your vanity table for a beauty fix, take a look in your kitchen — you might be surprised how much what you eat can affect your skin and hair!

1. Dark chocolate

Contrary to popular belief, chocolate does not cause acne. In fact, research has shown that dark chocolate even protects skin from sun damage. Chocolate, or rather raw cacao, contains anti-aging antioxidants called flavonoids, which fight free radicals to protect your skin from UV damage and prevent the appearance of wrinkles, fine lines, and skin discolorations.

Chocolate also makes you feel happy — when you eat it, the brain releases endorphins, your body’s natural feel-good chemical, and phenylethylamine, which elicits the head-over-heels feeling of falling in love. When you feel good, you look good.

2. Walnuts

Walnuts contain nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin E that help your skin stay smooth and plump. Walnuts also protect your hair from sun damage and keep it lustrous and shiny. Get your daily dose of by eating a handful raw or throwing some chopped walnuts in your salad, pasta or dessert.

3. Spinach

Spinach contains a triple dose of wrinkle-fighting antioxidants: vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene. These all work together to protect your skin from the sun’s aging UV rays (but you should still wear sunscreen, of course). Enjoy spinach in salads, green smoothies, or lightly sautéed with coconut oil, garlic and a dash of sea salt.

4. Lentils

These legumes are a good source of protein and iron, which support full-bodied hair. Enjoy them as a side dish, in a hearty soup, or make your own lentil-veggie burgers.

5. Chia seeds

These tiny seeds are packed with protein, fiber, and loads of omega-3s — all great for your skin and hair. Since chia seeds absorb up to 12 times their weight in water, they also keep you feeling fuller longer. Enjoy them as a pudding, in smoothies, or as an egg substitute in vegan baking.

6. Almonds

Almonds are rich in flavonoids and vitamin E, which is vital to skin health. They can help ward off damaging free radicals and even oxidative damage caused by smoking. Almonds also make a great source of satisfying fiber and protein, and their manganese and selenium content helps keep your hair shiny. Snack on a handful of almonds, or enjoy them in almond butter spread on apple slices.

7. Flaxseeds

Flaxseeds provide a huge boost of omega-3 fatty acids, which are beyond good for you. Preliminary studies have shown that both omega-6 and omega- 3 fatty acids help prevent or treat skin conditions like acne and eczema. The anti-inflammatory properties of omega-3s can also maintain a healthy rate of skin cell renewal. To ensure your body absorbs all these beauty-boosting benefits, eat flaxseeds in ground or “meal” form.

8. Avocados

Avocados are the ultimate “get gorgeous” food. Ever seen shampoos or facial masks using avocados? There’s a reason for that.

Key for hair, skin, and nails, the monounsaturated fatty acids packed into these creamy treats not only help lower bad cholesterol levels, but also reduce the appearance of aging in skin. Avocados also contain antioxidants, fiber, potassium, magnesium, and folate, and one avocado is packed with more potassium than a medium banana — nearly 700 milligrams! Eat avocado in guacamole, sliced on top of a salad or sandwich, or even with a spoon — we won’t judge.

9. Berries

Berries are loaded with anti-inflammatory agents and vitamins that help protect you from premature aging. The antioxidants in berries help minimize the damage of free radicals, which can accelerate wrinkle formation and cause disease. Additionally, berries are packed with vitamin C, which keeps skin firm and strong. Also known as ascorbic acid, vitamin C is essential to the production of collagen, a protein that aids in the growth of cells and blood vessels. Eat a handful of your favorite berry with breakfast, or pureed into a smoothie.

10. Seaweed

Sea vegetables like nori or wakame are loaded with iron and phytonutrients. All of these nutrients can help you attain gorgeous, supple skin. Iron, manganese, iodine, copper, zinc, omega-3 fatty acids, and selenium — all found in sea vegetables — are essential for gorgeous hair, skin, and nails. Enjoy these in mixed green salads, toss some wakame into your miso soup, or wrap up some veggies in nori sheets to make nori rolls.”

This article and more found ~ here ~

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/thrive-market/beauty-foods-for-glowing-skin-shiny-hair_b_7192880.html

Photo credit: Paul Delmont, Thrive Market

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    Top 10 Foods for Healthy Hair

    When it comes to healthy hair, it’s not just what you put on your tresses that counts — it’s what you put in your body, too.

    Better-looking hair can start at your next meal.
    “Just like every other part of your body, the cells and processes that support strong, vibrant hair depend on a balanced diet,” says New York nutritionist Lisa Drayer, MA, RD, author of The Beauty Diet.
    It can take longer to notice changes (both good or bad!) in your hair than in your skin. For example, “just one week with a poor diet can yield acne flare-ups or dry, sallow skin within days,” says New York City dermatologist Cybele Fishman, MD, “but with hair, it can take a few months for a nutritional deficiency or the effects of a crash diet to show up.”
    The nutrients you eat today help fortify the hair follicle — from which each strand is born — and the scalp that surrounds it. “Healthier follicles? Healthier hair. Healthier scalp? Healthier hair!” Drayer says.
    Of course, there’s more to your hair than what you eat. Smoking, hormonal imbalances, and not enough sleep can also affect how your hair looks and feels. No magic nutrient can make up for those concerns.
    Still, you have a lot more leverage than you might think. If you eat a balanced, varied, protein-rich diet that focuses on the following 10 foods, you’ll be giving your hair the TLC it needs and deserves.

    1. Salmon
    Besides being rich in protein and vitamin D (both are key to strong hair) the omega-3 fatty acids found in this tasty cold-water fish are the true superstar. Your body can’t make those fatty acids, which your body needs to grow hair. About 3% of the hair shaft is make up of these fatty acids, Drayer says. Omega-3s are also found in cell membranes in the skin of your scalp, and in the natural oils that keep your scalp and hair hydrated.
    Other options: If salmon doesn’t thrill you, you can also get essential fatty acids from fish like herring, sardines, trout, and mackerel, as well as avocado, pumpkin seeds, and walnuts (see below for more wonderful things about walnuts.)

    2. Walnuts
    These are the only type of nut that have a significant amount of omega-3 fatty acids. They’re also rich in biotin and vitamin E, which helps protect your cells from DNA damage. Since your hair rarely gets much shielding from the sun, this is especially great, Drayer says. Too little biotin can lead to hair loss. Walnuts also have copper, a mineral that helps keep your natural hair color rich and lustrous, Fishman says.
    Other options: Try using walnut oil in your salad dressing or stir-fry instead of canola or safflower, Fishman says.

    3. Oysters
    Oysters are rich in zinc, a lack of which can lead to hair loss (even in your eyelashes), as well as a dry, flaky scalp. Three ounces has a whopping 493% of your daily value. You can get some zinc through fortified cereals and whole grain breads, but oysters can boast a good level of protein too. “Remember, hair is about 97% protein,” Drayer says. Without enough protein, your body can’t replace the hairs that you naturally shed every day and what you do make can be dry, brittle, or weak.
    Other options: Get your fill of zinc with nuts, beef, and eggs.

    4. Sweet Potatoes
    Sweet potatoes are a great source of the antioxidant beta carotene, which your body turns into vitamin A. “Basically, every cell of the body cannot function without enough A,” Fishman says. It also helps protect and produce the oils that sustain your scalp, and being low on vitamin A can even leave you with itchy, irksome dandruff.
    Other options: Carrots, cantaloupe, mangoes, pumpkin, and apricots are all good sources of beta carotene.

    5. Eggs
    A great source of protein, eggs are loaded with four key minerals: zinc, selenium, sulfur, and iron. Iron is especially important, because it helps cells carry oxygen to the hair follicles, and too little iron (anemia) is a major cause of hair loss, particularly in women, Drayer says.
    Other options: You can also boost your iron stores with animal sources, including chicken, fish, pork, and beef.
    6. Spinach
    The iron, beta carotene, folate, and vitamin C in spinach help keep hair follicles healthy and scalp oils circulating.
    Other options: Try similarly nutrient-rich dark, leafy vegetables such as broccoli, kale, and Swiss chard.

    7. Lentils
    Tiny but mighty, these legumes are teeming with protein, iron, zinc, and biotin, says Fishman, making it a great staple for vegetarian, vegans, and meat eaters.
    Other options: Toss other beans such as soybeans (the young ones are called edamame) and kidney beans into your soup or salad.
    8. Greek yogurt
    Cruise the dairy aisle for low-fat options such as Greek yogurt, which is high in hair-friendly protein, vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid — an ingredient you’ll often see on hair care product labels), and vitamin D. Emerging research links vitamin D and hair follicle health, but exactly how that works isn’t clear, Fishman says.
    Other options: Cottage cheese, low-fat cheese, and skim milk also fit the bill.

    9. Blueberries
    Exotic super fruits may come and go but when it comes to vitamin C, “It’s hard to top this nutrient superhero,” Drayer says. C is critical for circulation to the scalp and supports the tiny blood vessels that feed the follicles. Too little C in your diet can lead to hair breakage.

    10. Poultry
    This everyday entree is extraordinary when it comes to protein, as well as hair-healthy zinc, iron, and B vitamins to keep strands strong and plentiful. Because hair is nearly all protein, “foods rich in protein are literally giving you the building blocks for hair,” Drayer says.

    By Elizabeth B. Krieger
    Reviewed by Victoria Barbosa, MD
    WebMD Feature
    Found at http://www.webmd.com/beauty/hair-styling/top-10-foods-for-healthy-hair?page=3

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      Biotin Rich Foods are Really Good for Healthy Hair

      There is so much you can do to have the healthy hair, and skin, and nails, that you want.

      At the salon we have topical oil treatments as well as organic shampoos and conditioners to treat your hair and get it as healthy as it can be.

      Diet also plays a big role in having healthy hair. Your hair needs nutrients, here is a list of foods that are rich in Biotin, which, (among a variety of health benefits), is good for your hair, skin, and nails.

      “Biotin is a water soluble B vitamin that is essential for bodily health. It helps the body to process fat and sugars, and it helps form a critical process in fat production in the body. Since biotin is so involved with creating the building blocks for basic body functions at a cellular level, it’s very important to have a sufficient supply of this nutritional element.

      Biotin is particularly necessary for pregnant women. When an expecting mother has an inadequate supply of biotin in her diet, certain conditions might be manifested in both the adult and the infant, where skin discolorations can indicate a biotin deficiency, which can have some negative effects.

      National health experts recommend 30 micrograms of biotin a day for pregnant and lactating women. Because this is a water soluble compound, it can’t easily be saved in the body long-term, so it’s important to get it into a regular diet.

      Here are some of the top choices for a regular intake of biotin.

      Swiss Chard – This green plant is a top producer of biotin. It’s also a great part of a healthy salad choice that will provide antioxidants and help balance a diet.

      Carrots – Carrots contain a supply of biotin, as well as beta-carotene, which helps with general eye health.

      Almonds, Walnuts and Other Nuts – A variety of nuts supply the body with biotin, and are a portable way to get proteins and other nutrition into a diet.

      Chicken Eggs – Eggs are a source of biotin, although it’s important to note that eating a diet unusually high in egg whites can actually be a catalyst for a biotin deficiency. That’s because a specific element in the egg whites binds to the element and prevents it from being distributed properly. It’s important to always consider how eggs are added to a diet in order to prevent this kind of vitamin deficiency.

      Goat’s Milk and Cow’s Milk – In addition to calcium and other healthy items, milks are also a source of biotin for the body.

      Berries and Fruits – Some types of berries, including strawberries and raspberries, can get the body a significant amount of biotin. These fruits also provide antioxidants and health benefits, as part of a natural, whole food approach to eating. Experts recommend buying local and organic when possible.

      Halibut – In addition to being “brain food,” this fish also contains large amounts of biotin. Think about adding it as an occasional entre.

      Vegetables – Other vegetables like onions, cucumbers and cauliflower all contain biotin, and are healthy ways to fit this vitamin into meals.

      The above are some of the healthiest ways to introduce biotin into a regular diet that will provide general health benefits, and also make sure that a biotin deficiency will not affect a pregnancy. Expecting mothers can learn more from their medical providers in terms of what to expect during the gestational term, and how to use a well-planned diet to guard against various health risks for herself and the baby.”

      you can find more interesting articles like this at:
      http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/vitamins-minerals/8-foods-rich-in-biotin.html#b

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