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Proof That Eating Organic Can Reduce Cancer

Proof That Eating Organic Can Reduce Cancer and how to reduce pesticides in your system by 90% in one week.

Despite the massive amount of evidence, some people refuse to believe that buying organic is a healthier option. I can’t be the only one whose ever been told that buying organic is a waste of money.

For some reason, a lot of people have this idea that conventionally grown produce is not only safe but just as good as organic food. I even had one guy tell me that eating organic is a complete scam and means nothing.

Well, let’s take a look at just a few things pesticides have been linked to:

CANCER
From the Department of Cancer Epidemiology at the Karolinska University Hospital,
In animal studies, many pesticides are carcinogenic, (e.g., organochlorines, creosote, and sulfallate) while others (notably, the organochlorines DDT, chlordane, and lindane) are tumor promoters. Some contaminants in commercial pesticide formulations also may pose a carcinogenic risk. In humans, arsenic compounds and insecticides used occupationally have been classified as carcinogens by the International Agency for Research on Cancer.
and from the College of Family Physicians of Canada
There is increasing controversy over the use of pesticides in the community. Studies looking at pesticide use and cancer have shown a positive relationship between exposure to pesticides and the development of some cancers, particularly in children.

FERTILITY
Results indicate that semen changes are multifactorial in the workers exposed to pesticides as there are numerous factors affecting sperm quality in occupational exposures. Majority of pesticides including organophosphoruses affect the male reproductive system by mechanisms such as reduction of sperm density and motility, inhibition of spermatogenesis, reduction of testis weights, reduction of sperm counts, motility, viability and density, and inducing sperm DNA damage, and increasing abnormal sperm morphology. Reduced weight of testes, epididymis, seminal vesicle, and ventral prostate, seminiferous tubule degeneration, change in plasma levels of testosterone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and luteinizing hormone (LH), decreased level and activity of the antioxidant enzymes in testes, and inhibited testicular steroidogenesis are other possible mechanisms. Moreover, DDT and its metabolites have estrogenic effects on males.

PARKINSON’S
From the Department of Nutrition at Harvard,
Exposure to pesticides was reported by 7,864 participants (5.7%), including 1,956 farmers, ranchers, or fishermen. Individuals exposed to pesticides had a 70% higher incidence of PD than those not exposed (adjusted relative risk, 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-2.3; p = 0.002).

CHILDHOOD CANCER
A growing body of epidemiological evidence demonstrates associations between parental use of pesticides, particularly insecticides, with acute lymphocytic leukemia and brain tumors. Prenatal, household, and occupational exposures (maternal and paternal) appear to be the largest risks. Prospective cohort studies link early-life exposure to organophosphates and organochlorine pesticides (primarily DDT) with adverse effects on neurodevelopment and behavior.
These are just four instances out of thousands that prove pesticides are harmful. It’s literally impossible to disagree with the research that’s out there. The good news is that you can reduce the pesticides in your system in just one week.

HOW TO REDUCE THE PESTICIDES IN YOUR SYSTEM IN ONE WEEK
Eat organic food. Seems too simple, right?

Wrong.

Dr. Liza Oates from the School of Health Sciences in Australia performed a study that demonstrated how an organic diet, followed for one week, reduced pesticides by 90%. Here are the highlights of the study:

Organophosphate pesticide exposure in Australian adults is mainly through the diet.
One week of eating mostly organic food reduced urine pesticide levels by nearly 90%.
The clinical relevance of reducing pesticide exposure requires further study.
Eating organic food is a precautionary approach to reduce pesticide exposure.
So the next time someone tells you buying organic isn’t worth it, that organic food isn’t any healthier or that conventionally grown food is safe, just shove this article in their face. People love that.
It’s also important to note that this study was performed in Australia, where they are much stricter about what they will and will not allow in their food supply. America has much looser regulations, and as you likely know refuses to even label GMOs. So depending on your diet, it may take longer to rid your body of pesticides. The important part is that you recognize and make a concerted effort to eat organically, and locally if possible. Supporting organic food means more will be grown, and your money won’t go toward support farms that use pesticides.

Sources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9498903

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2231435/#__ffn_sectitle

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24487096

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16802290

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23184105

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S001393511400067X

article found at http://www.ancestral-nutrition.com/proof-eating-organic-can-reduce-cancer-reduce-pesticides-system-90-one-week/

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    Six Health Benefits of Gardening

    Growing your own vegetable garden can do more than provide tasty produce—gardening can improve health, save money and even boost mood.

    Community gardens, backyard plots, and even window boxes are gaining in popularity, and tomatoes are among the first seeds new gardeners plant. Whole generations of Americans have never eaten homegrown tomatoes—never experienced the beefy taste, the grassy aroma, the juiciness, and the silken texture of tomatoes right off the vine.

    And the experience of eating your first fresh-picked tomato can be sublime. “I’ve had people tell me it was the best tomato they’ve ever eaten, and they’re probably right,” says Jeff Moyer, farm director of the Rodale Institute. It can even be life changing, sending you hunting for new healthy recipes (though we’ve got six tasty ones right here!) and boosting your veggie intake. These six women are proof that gardening can make you happier and healthier.

    Gardening can save your…waistline

    Michele Owens, 51, Saratoga Springs, NY

    Michele Owens is in good shape chiefly because she gardens. Although she runs for exercise in the winter, she finds the sport to be mind numbing and probably would have given up on it by now if she had to do it year-round. And Owens says she’d never go to the gym to lift weights. “I’m bored to tears at the gym, but I’m never bored gardening, and I’ve been doing it for twenty years,” she says. “It’s a really complete form of exercise attached to a huge sense of accomplishment.” Every April, when Owens trades her running shoes for garden boots and starts mulching and planting, she inevitably drops 5 pounds, and the weight loss lasts all summer long. As her crops ripen, they require less work. But on April and May weekends, she’s in her 1,900-square-foot garden for up to 5 hours a day—hauling more weight and doing more squats than she’d ever do at the gym.

    Gardening can save your health

    Hope Anderson, 35, Grand Island, NE

    Hope Anderson hated tomatoes before she planted some herself. “Now I eat them right off the vine, they’re so sweet,” she says. She started her vegetable garden last summer, in part to make sure that she and her family ate a varied, healthy diet. And it’s working. Anderson has even caught her three kids sneaking tomatoes right out of the garden (just like their mother!). This spring, they begged to pick out their own seeds and eagerly helped Mom plant seedlings. Son Bretton, 11, chose carrots, while his younger brother, Bradley, 10, went for watermelon. Their sister, Mystic-Sage, 6, will be planting her own row of corn. Anderson added kohlrabi, pumpkins, asparagus, strawberries, cucumbers, and lettuces to the mix. And, of course, Roma and cherry tomatoes—lots of them. (Toss ’em all in our spring food recipes.)

    MORE: Easy Tips for Pain-Free Gardening

    Gardening can save your…planet

    Anita Ferry, 50, Los Angeles, CA

    Anita Ferry lives in an LA apartment with her boyfriend of 13 years and her 81-year-old mother. But she makes the most of her limited space—planting containers by her front door, growing mushrooms on the dining room table, sprouting seedlings under a grow lamp on her balcony, and tending boxes on her building’s roof. She also farms a 400-square-foot community garden plot 3 miles from home. “I love knowing exactly where my food comes from—and how it affects the world in return,” she says.

    Ferry finds the community garden’s composting culture very inspiring, and she estimates that at least 30% of her household waste now goes straight to her compost bin. “Composting should be made mandatory for every household, so we can cut down on all the landfills and heal our soil,” she says. “I save all my vegetable trimmings, eggshells, coffee grounds, and tea bags and add them to my compost, which in turn goes back into the soil in my garden to help nourish the delicious food I am growing.”

    Gardening can save your…mental well-being

    Anne Costello, 44, La Grange, IL

    Anne Costello advises attorneys for a busy law firm on the technological aspects of their cases—a hectic, around-the-clock job. She’s also mom to two daughters, ages 7 and 10. When she gets stressed out, Costello retreats to her backyard garden for relief. “I always feel better getting outside and digging in the dirt,” she says. “Plus, gardening is a solitary, meditative experience that I crave. I love that I can share the garden with my family when I want to, but it can also be just for me.” And she relishes seeing things grow. “My work is so abstract and long term, but the garden gives me a definite end result,” she says. Last summer, her family’s house flooded so badly that they were forced to rebuild and have been living in a rental property, without a garden. “It was the most stressful year of my life, and I gained a lot of weight,” she says.

    “I cannot wait to get back to my own home and my garden.”

    Gardening can save your…bank account

    Gayle Bowe, 32, New Paltz, NY

    Gayle Bowe and her husband, Justin, are new parents and novice gardeners. Before their baby was born earlier this year, they decided to change their lifestyle—to create a healthier environment and more solid financial footing for their growing family. They turned to their neighbor, Jean, a lifelong vegetable gardener, to help them dig a garden that would feed their family—including ready-to-puree produce for their new baby, Henry, now 5 months old. “Organic baby food is expensive: on average, $1.50 per jar,” Bowe says. She estimates that they’ll save at least $300 this year by preparing their own organic purees. “And as far as Henry goes, I want nothing but pure, untainted goodness,” she says. “Processed baby foods are cooked at high temperatures that destroy some vitamins. Making my own will ensure that he gets all the nutrients he needs, without any extra starchy fillers, sugars, or salt.” (See which fruits and veggies you should always buy organic.)

    Gardening can save your…community

    Asenath Andrews, 60, Detroit, MI

    Twenty-five years ago, when Asenath Andrews founded Catherine Ferguson Academy—a Detroit public school for pregnant teens, as well as teen mothers and their kids—one of the first things she did was plant a garden in the school yard. “If you’re somebody’s mother, you’re supposed to be able to feed your kids,” she says. “The only way to guarantee that is to garden.”

    She’s also helped develop an urban gardening program that teaches at-risk students nutrition, construction, marketing, cooking, and farming skills. The program benefits the greater community, too—students sell fresh, organic produce from their 2-acre garden at the school’s farm stand once a week and at Detroit farmers’ markets on weekends. “Gardening has clearly given these girls skills and values they can carry with them forever,” Andrews says.

    This article and more found at:
    http://www.prevention.com/food/simple-meals-eat-clean

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