x
BREAST CANCER LINKED TO PERMANENT HAIR DYE

BREAST CANCER LINKED TO PERMANENT HAIR DYE AND CHEMICAL HAIR STRAIGHTENERS IN STUDY OF ALMOST 50,000 WOMEN
BY ROSIE MCCALL ON 12/3/19 AT 7:00 PM EST

Traditional salons are slow to change their ways but with more and more scientific data showing how incredibly toxic and harmful traditional beauty products are, and have been for a long time, more and more women are seeking a healthy alternative to what the traditional salon is offering. That’s where organic salons like My Hair Trip Salon Denver comes in, offering non-toxic, non-harmful beauty solutions that are healthy and also work as well or better than any traditional products and lines available today!

“Women who regularly use permanent hair dye could be increasing their risk of breast cancer up to 60 percent, according to scientists writing in the International Journal of Cancer.

A study based on the medical records of more than 45,000 women found a positive correlation between permanent hair dye and breast cancer—particularly among those who are black.

While the paper is based on patterns and trends and, as such, doesn’t confirm a direct cause, it adds to research suggesting there may be carcinogens lurking in commonly-used beauty products.

“The results do not surprise me,” Otis W. Brawley, medical oncologist and epidemiologist at the Hopkins-Kimmel Cancer Center, told Newsweek. “Many of us have worried that the chemicals in especially the permanent hair dyes and hair straighteners have the potential to cause cancer.”

Taken as a group women who regularly dyed their hair appeared to be increasing their risk of developing breast cancer by 9 percent. However, for black women, the risk of developing breast cancer was significantly higher—at 45 percent.

This increased even further, to 60 percent, among black women who heavily used hair dye, defined in this case as once (or more) every five to eight weeks. The associated risk for white women, in contrast, was 7 percent for regular use and 8 percent for heavy use.

There also appeared to be differences depending on the type of hair dye used. Dark hair dye was associated with a 51 percent increase in risk for black women and an 8 percent in risk for white women. When it came to light hair dye, there appeared to be a 46 percent increase in risk for black women and a 12 percent increase risk for white women.

Why there are racial variations is unclear, but the researchers suggest it may be linked to differences in the way it is used or differences in the way products marketed for black and white audiences are made. The study’s authors reference previous research that suggests those made for black women could have higher levels of endocrine-disrupting chemicals.

“Black women are already at an increased risk of breast cancer, and drawing a clear line to hair products is difficult,” Stephanie Bernik, MD, Chief of Breast Surgery at Mount Sinai West in New York told Newsweek.

“Having said that, I do believe the study gives us enough evidence to call for a prospective trial designed to specifically look at this one factor to see if the increased risk of cancer persists. In the meantime, I would caution patients that there is a possible link between hair dyes and cancer, although more research is needed.”

They also found a significant correlation between breast cancer risk and chemical hair straighteners, with the researchers emphasizing this needs to be backed up by other research. (Other studies have confirmed no breast cancer risk associated with hair relaxers)

However, in this case, the risk was consistent, increasing across all races by 30 percent for women who use chemical hair straighteners every five to eight weeks or more. Though, as the study authors point out, this is likely to affect black women more as chemical straighteners are used by black women more than they are by white women.

As far as their advice for women who dye or chemically straighten their hair goes, Dale Sandler, Ph.D., chief of the NIEHS Epidemiology Branch who was involved in the research, points to the numerous other carcinogenic chemicals people are regularly exposed to.

Brawley advises women use hair dye and chemical hair straighteners very carefully but says there are other things that will have more of an impact on whether someone will develop cancer or not.

“I would also point out that the combination of obesity, consuming too many calories and lack of physical activity has a much higher relative risk for breast cancer in both black and white women,” said Brawley, a former Chief Medical and Scientific Officer of the American Cancer Society.

Michael Jones, Senior Staff Scientist in Epidemiology at The Institute of Cancer Research, said: “It is too early to make a firm recommendation on the basis of one study, and further research is needed. The whole literature needs to be evaluated by expert groups, bringing together the evidence to make recommendations” he told Newsweek. He adds there are limitations to the study.

“The Sisters Study is a good prospective cohort study—but women were recruited to the study because they had a sister with breast cancer, so the conclusions wouldn’t necessarily hold true for women in the wider population, hence the need for further confirmation.”

There were no observable differences in cancer risk between women who did not die their hair period and those who used temporary or semi-permanent dye.

The research was based on the medical records of more than 46,000 women aged 35 to 74 from the Sister Study, meaning all women involved had a close relative who had died of breast cancer. The results include information from a follow-up period of roughly 8 years, when 2,794 breast cancers were identified.

The article has been updated to include comments from Stephanie Bernik, Chief of Breast Surgery at Mount Sinai West, and Otis W. Brawley, medical oncologist and epidemiologist at the Hopkins-Kimmel Cancer Center.”

This article and more from NEWSWEEK

Leave a reply
    x
    Chemicals in Cosmetics

    When it comes to beauty products, the effects of the ingredients they contain can be more than just skin deep. The cosmetics industry uses thousands of synthetic chemicals in its products, in everything from lipstick and lotion to shampoo and shaving cream.

    Many of these substances are also used in industrial manufacturing processes to clean industrial equipment, stabilize pesticides and grease gears. And we can all agree that an ingredient that effectively scours a garage floor may not be the best choice for a facial cleanser.

    In the U.S., major loopholes in federal law allow the cosmetics industry to put thousands of synthetic chemicals into personal care products, even if those chemicals are linked to cancer, infertility or birth defects. At the same time as untested chemicals have been steadily introduced into our environment, breast cancer incidence has risen dramatically.

    Following are some of the chemicals commonly found in cosmetics and what they do to us.

    Phthalates
    Knowledge is power. Learn how to avoid the nasty chemicals in personal care products.

    Tips for choosing safe cosmetics >
    Phthalates are a group of endocrine-disrupting chemicals that are found in cosmetics like nail polish and in synthetic fragrance—both perfumes and fragrance ingredients in other cosmetic products. Phthalate exposure has been linked to early puberty in girls, a risk factor for later-life breast cancer. Some phthalates also act as weak estrogens in cell culture systems.

    Triclosan
    Triclosan is used in antibacterial soaps, deodorants and toothpastes to limit the growth of bacteria and mold. The chemical, which is classified as a pesticide, can affect the body’s hormone systems—especially thyroid hormones, which regulate metabolism—and may disrupt normal breast development. Widespread use of triclosan may also contribute to bacterial resistance to antimicrobial agents.

    1,4-dioxane
    1,4-dioxane is not listed on ingredient labels. It is a petroleum-derived contaminant formed in the manufacture of shampoos, body wash, children’s bath products and other sudsing cosmetics. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has ranked it as a possible carcinogen, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) has identified it as a reasonably anticipated carcinogen.

    Information from the Campaign for Safe Cosmetics on 1,4-dioxane in bath products
    Parabens
    Parabens are a group of compounds widely used as an antifungal agent, preservative and antimicrobial in creams, lotions, ointments and other cosmetics, including underarm deodorants. They are absorbed through the skin and have been identified in biopsy samples from breast tumors.

    Ethylene Oxide
    Ethylene oxide is used to sterilize surgical instruments. It can also be a contaminant of personal care products such as shampoos and body washes, because it is used to buffer the harshness of some sudsing agents, and trace amounts can be left behind. It is classified as a known human carcinogen and is one of 51 chemicals that the National Toxicology Program (NTP) identifies as mammary carcinogens in animals.

    1,3-butadiene
    Shaving creams, spray sunscreens and foundations, and anti-fungal treatments that contain the propellant isobutene may be contaminated with the carcinogen 1,3-butadiene. Exposure occurs mainly through inhalation. This chemical has been found to increase mammary tumors in rodents.

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)
    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of chemicals that occur naturally in coal, crude oil and gasoline. One of the more common PAHs is naphthalene. Some cosmetics and shampoos are made with coal tar and therefore may contain PAHs. They have been shown to increase risk for breast cancer.

    Placental Extract
    Placental extract is derived from human or animal placentas and is used in hair conditioners, shampoos and other grooming aids, particularly those marketed to women of color. The National Toxicology Program (NTP) has identified progesterone, the major hormonal contaminant in placental extracts, as a reasonably anticipated carcinogen.

    Lead
    Lead may be a contaminant in over 650 cosmetic products, including sunscreens, foundation, nail colors, lipsticks and whitening toothpaste. Lead is a proven neurotoxin, linked to learning, language and behavioral problems. It has also been linked to miscarriage, reduced fertility in men and women, and delays in puberty onset in girls.

    article found here

    Leave a reply
      x
      Non-toxic Hair Color in Denver?

      Naturally Better Colour
      Organic Colour Systems is the first-ever range of permanent colours made from the maximum amount of certified organic ingredients and the minimum amount of chemicals… to colour hair as naturally as possible.

      Our unique approach is gentle but effective and easily colours even resistant grey hair.

      And because hair responds better to natural ingredients it looks naturally healthier and glossier with radiant, longer-lasting colour.

      Naturally Healthier Hair
      Most hair colour products use harsh chemicals like ammonia that damage hair in the colouring process, stripping hair’s natural health and shine.

      Organic Colour Systems is different. We’re kind to hair and it shows.

      By using fewer chemicals and no ammonia, Organic Colour Systems maintains hair’s essential protein and moisture balance.

      And it doesn’t damage hair in the colouring process.

      Our unique colour and care system restores even damaged hair, giving it healthier body, suppleness and shine.

      Colour without limits
      Versatile, with easy colour correction, Organic Colour Systems takes the limits off creativity imposed by inflexible, harsh chemical products.

      It’s easy to create fiery reds, intense coppers, rich golds, auburn browns, frosty platinums and an incredible range of natural tones.

      What’s more, with Organic Colour Systems colours are true to the colour chart and stay locked-in for longer.

      The Full Range
      The full range is made up of 64 fully intermixable colours and concentrates; plus a selection of Activators, 2 Lightening powders and oil.

      What color line does your salon use? Alfaparf Milano? Redkin? Matrix? Schwarzkopf? keune? Goldwell? Box color? You are causing real harm to, not only your hair, but to your overall health as well! your salon or stylist might be telling you their line is “ammonia free” or that it has minimal amounts of ammonia or that it is healthy for you and your hair, or that it is healthier than it once was, or that organic color doesn’t work… Do your research, they are not being honest with you. It’s your health and your body. if you are wondering about organic beauty or have questions about the brands being used on you, give us a ring, we’ve done the research and would be happy to help!

      Leave a reply
        x
        “The Health Effects of Hair Coloring” with traditional chemical-based hair dyes

        The Health Effects of Hair Coloring with chemical-based hair dyes

        “The health effects of hair coloring are, to a certain extent, unknown. And the link between hair coloring and cancer is controversial and, to date, inconclusive. But many of the chemicals contained in frequently used hair dyes have been shown to be dangerous. Such chemicals can cause allergic reactions and perhaps even neurological problems.

        There are alternatives to such hair dyes, such as plant-based henna and infrared techniques that open up hair shafts to allow coloring. Such “green” solutions are advisable for anyone who wants to avoid the risks associated with many hair coloring products.

        Types of Chemically Based Hair Coloring
        There are three main types of chemically based hair coloring products, as explained by Surviving-Hairloss.com. Temporary hair dyes are like surface paint: They don’t penetrate the hair shaft and are easily washed off. Semi-permanent dyes contain smaller molecules that do penetrate the hair shaft. Permanent dyes use the harshest products, which break up the original color pigment in your hair and replace it.

        Potentially Dangerous Chemicals in Hair Coloring Products
        Chemicals in hair coloring products include PPD, or para-phenylenediamine, which can cause allergic reactions such as burning and headaches and is also a potential carcinogen; coal tar, which is in 70 percent of hair coloring products and can cause allergic reactions; lead acetate, which has been banned in European countries as a possible carcinogen and, as with, other lead products, may cause potentially serious neurological problems; DMDM hydantoin, a preservative that has been linked to immune system problems; ammonia, which can be toxic and corrosive and may cause respiratory problems; and resorcinol, which can be an irritant and is a potential carcinogen.

        Hair Coloring and Cancer Risks
        A potential link between hair-coloring and cancer has been debated for years. The American Cancer Society states, “The evidence from these studies remain quite inconclusive. Most of the available evidence does not support a link to cancer risk. Those studies that do show a link find that it is too weak to be considered a major public health concern.”

        A study from the University of Southern California in 2001 found a doubling of the rate of bladder cancer for women who regularly used permanent dye on their hair, as well as for hair stylists who worked with such dyes. However, those results were not replicated in subsequent studies.

        The American Cancer Society believes that larger studies are needed and notes that some ingredients in hair coloring products have caused cancer in lab animals.

        Hair Coloring and Other Health Risks
        Chemically based hair coloring products can cause allergic reactions leading to severe skin and eye irritations, according to the American Cancer Society. In rare cases, the eye irritations can lead to blindness. Such products should be tested on a small patch of skin before they are used on the hair and scalp.

        Considerations
        Chemically based hair coloring products contain some nasty stuff. There are perfectly good substitutes, such as plant-based henna dye, that don’t contain such risks. You can avoid any potential health risks associated with hair coloring by choosing products that are not only safer but also environmentally friendly. Call it a win-win solution.”

        My Hair Trip Salon Denver offers alternatives to traditional, chemical-based hair dye systems, and is Denver’s highest rated eco-friendly salon and spa.

        References: http://www.livestrong.com/article/211736-the-health-effects-of-hair-coloring/
        Surviving-Hairloss.com: How Much Do You Know About Hair Coloring?
        USC News: Study Points to Bladder Cancer Risk From Long-term Hair Dye Use
        American Cancer Society: Hair Dyes

        Leave a reply
          x
          3 Lessons From Jennifer Aniston’s Brazilian Blowout Diaster

          Jennifer Aniston chopped off 6 inches of her infamous, honey-hued hair after a mishap with controversial keratin treatment, Brazilian Blowout.

          From her iconic “Rachel” layered hairstyle in the TV show, Friends, to today’s soft, a-line bob Jennifer Aniston’s hair is no stranger to the spotlight.

          All Keratin Treatments Are Not Created Equal
          A whirlwind of controversy has circled treatments such as, Brazilian Blowout as early as 2005. This is due to the inclusion of formaldehyde in their product’s smoothing solution.

          In 2011, the National Toxicology Program, an interagency program of the Department of Health and Human Services, named formaldehyde as a known human carcinogen.

          There has been additional concern that once the product’s solution is heated near the scalp (necessary for application), formaldehyde can penetrate the scalp and hair follicle, causing irreversible damage to the cells responsible for hair growth.

          Meaning, once the hair follicle is damaged, it will have difficulty growing hair, again.

          “If Aniston wanted to maintain her enviable lustrous locks, she could have opted for a keratin treatment that is both formaldehyde-free and contains L-cystine, an amino acid that promotes hair growth,” says Organic Salon Systems’ Technical Director, Rebecca Gregory.

          Lesson 1: Opt for a keratin treatment that is absent of formaldehyde, and promotes hair health. Ex Keragreen

          Heavy Chemical Treatments Can Hurt Hair More Than Help It
          “We are constantly up against this battle,” Gregory continues, “people use hair products that give their hair a temporary feeling of health and shine, but in reality, these products are just packed with petrochemicals and plastics that end up causing the hair to be dry and brittle in the long run.”

          Celebrity Hair Stylist, Rachel Wood says she’s, “not surprised Jen’s doing the chop. Many [treatments] have chemicals that can damage the hair.”
          Lesson 2: Chemically-laden hair products give hair a false feeling of health, and damage strands more in the long run.

          Overly Damaged Hair = Necessary Hair Chop
          Jennifer Aniston’s Brazilian Blowout-induced haircut reminds us that once hair has been damaged beyond repair, it will need to be trimmed (yes, sometimes that trim can be up to 6+ inches).

          If severely damaged hair goes uncut, the hair strands will eventually split completely in half and fall out at the root.

          Which brings us to our final lesson:

          Lesson 3: Damaged hair will have to be cut in order to prevent hair fall and promote healthy hair growth.

          This article and more found at: http://organiccolorsystems.com/jennifer-aniston-brazilian-blowout/

          Leave a reply